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Ground Truthing the Future: Using Contact Era Archaeological Information to Test and Communicate Sea Level Change

Author(s): Edward B Lane ; Brent Lane

Year: 2015

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Summary

Coastal North Carolina has 3,375 miles of shoreline, much of it fronting low-lying lands increasingly vulnerable to flooding and inundation exacerbated by a long-term process of sea-level rise. This vulnerability has made the area a fruitful laboratory for environmental science studies of sea level change and its environmental and societal effects. But the issue of forecasting sea level rise for public policy and land use management has become controversial due in part to the difficulty of describing sea level forecasts as an extrapolation of demonstrated past change and its effects on human activities. Much of the affected areas have well researched contact era Native American and early Colonial sites that offer quantitative and qualitative evidence of both the extent and effects of historic sea level change. The researchers used such archaeological site information to augment environmental sciences studies to enhance the communicability of sea level change information.


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Cite this Record

Ground Truthing the Future: Using Contact Era Archaeological Information to Test and Communicate Sea Level Change. Edward B Lane, Brent Lane. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Seattle, Washington. 2015 ( tDAR id: 434154)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 554

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America