The Church on the Hill: Inter-related Narratives, Conflicting Priorities, and the Power of Community Engagement

Author(s): Lyle Torp; Matthew Palus

Year: 2016

Summary

Fort Stevens is a well-known fort within the Civil War Defenses of Washington. Prior to the Civil War, the land was owned by Betsey Butler, a free black woman, who sold the land to the trustees of Emory Chapel in 1855 for the construction of a church. The church was razed for the construction of Fort Massachusetts in 1861, which was later expanded and renamed Fort Stevens in 1863. The congregation rebuilt the church following the Civil War. The context of the Emory Church is entwined with the Civil War, both with the physical fortifications associated with the CWDW as well as the growth of the African-American community that developed in the shadow of the fort in the years following the war. The paper looks at the role that archeology plays in integrating significant aspects of a diachronic landscape that has resulted in conflicting values of place. 

Cite this Record

The Church on the Hill: Inter-related Narratives, Conflicting Priorities, and the Power of Community Engagement. Lyle Torp, Matthew Palus. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 435085)

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 908