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Mahogany and Sugar for Tobacco, Booze, and Salt-Pork: Consumerism and Consumption at 19th-Century Lamanai, Belize

Author(s): Adam F. W. Rigby ; Tracie Mayfield

Year: 2017

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Summary

This presentation outlines archaeological research focused on the nineteenth-century, British sugar plantation settlement at Lamanai, northwestern Belize. Little is known about the eighteenth- and nineteenth- centuries at Lamanai, and this ongoing project aims to answer questions regarding how life (residential, industrial, and administrative) was structured.

Archaeological data presented here includes the results of recent archaeological excavations (2014) and a study of previously excavated archaeological materials recovered at the site over the past 30 years (2009), conducted by the authors. Much of the diagnostic archaeological evidence has taken the form of ceramic remains, but glass, bone and metal objects are also present. Archival research has also shed greater light on the operational history of the site and the composition of its labour force. The project’s core theoretical and methodological foundations will also be discussed, which framed the most recent studies at Lamanai and will continue to inform future research endeavours.


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Cite this Record

Mahogany and Sugar for Tobacco, Booze, and Salt-Pork: Consumerism and Consumption at 19th-Century Lamanai, Belize. Adam F. W. Rigby, Tracie Mayfield. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Fort Worth, TX. 2017 ( tDAR id: 435210)


Keywords

General
Belize Ceramics Sugar

Geographic Keywords
United Kingdom Western Europe

Temporal Keywords
18th-19th Centuries


Spatial Coverage

min long: -8.158; min lat: 49.955 ; max long: 1.749; max lat: 60.722 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 319

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America