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The Pirates of the Pamlico: A Maritime Cultural Landsca­­pe Investigation of the Pirates of Colonial North Carolina and their Place in the State’s Cultural Memory

Author(s): Allyson G. Ropp

Year: 2017

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Summary

Colonial North Carolina, 1663-1730, was a poor colony in the British Empire. The landscape provided opportunities for pirates to establish operational bases. Besides Edward ‘Blackbeard’ Teach, numerous others roamed the colony. This study explores colonial North Carolina use as a pirate haven, analyzing historical and archaeological data sets within the broader context of a maritime cultural landscape. Maps showing known pirate bases are overlaid with colonial settlements to determine geographic preferences for residence. Investigations of the modern urban landscapes studies the collective pirate memory manifested in place and street names. Preliminary findings indicate that pirates had limited interaction with the colonists in the south, but significantly more in the middle and northern sections of the colony. They also show that certain pirates are non-existent in the state’s cultural memory, while others are more evident in all places of the state without the pirates every setting foot in those areas. 


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The Pirates of the Pamlico: A Maritime Cultural Landsca­­pe Investigation of the Pirates of Colonial North Carolina and their Place in the State’s Cultural Memory. Allyson G. Ropp. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Fort Worth, TX. 2017 ( tDAR id: 435378)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
Colonial, 1650-1730


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 169

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America