Shipwrecks, Doghole Ports, and the Lumber Trade: Maritime Cultural Landscape Survey of California’s Sonoma Coast

Summary

California’s Sonoma Coast is a rugged and beautiful seashore with a wealth of natural resources extending from kelp forests to redwood groves. Humans have interacted with this marine environment for thousands of years; it has shaped their lives and they have left their mark on the landscape. During the mid-19th and early 20th century, the Sonoma lumber trade greatly affected the coastal environment as it contributed to the economic development of the American West Coast. In 2016, California State Parks and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries conducted a maritime cultural landscape survey along the Sonoma Coast that integrated the study of submerged and terrestrial archaeological resources to reveal the lumber trade’s maritime cultural landscape. From upland lumbering operations to doghole ports and shipwrecks, the Sonoma Coast holds the physical traces of its role in building California and developing the nation’s economy. 

Cite this Record

Shipwrecks, Doghole Ports, and the Lumber Trade: Maritime Cultural Landscape Survey of California’s Sonoma Coast. Tricia Dodds, Matthew S. Lawrence, Deborah Marx. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Fort Worth, TX. 2017 ( tDAR id: 435481)

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Keywords

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 538