Laser Scanning as a Methodology for the Documentation and Interpretation of Archaeological Ships: A Case Study Using the 18th Century Ship from Alexandria, VA and the 18th Century Ship Found Below the World Trade Center in New York.

Author(s): Christopher Dostal

Year: 2018

Summary

In January of 2016, the remains of an 18th century wooden ship were found during construction on the waterfront of Alexandria, VA. The ship was excavated and stored, and in June of 2017, the disarticulated timbers were shipped to the Conservation Research Laboratory at Texas A&M University for documentation and conservation. To document the ship, each individual timber is laser-scanned, and the individual laser scans are being re-assembled in the nurbs 3-D modelling suite Rhinoceros 5. This methodology was recently developed by the author for the documentation of the ship remains found under the World Trade Center in New York City, and this paper will discuss the methodology, lessons learned from both projects,  the challenges of interpreting an archaeological ship with 3-D mesh models, and effective methods for presenting this knowledge both academically and publically.  

Cite this Record

Laser Scanning as a Methodology for the Documentation and Interpretation of Archaeological Ships: A Case Study Using the 18th Century Ship from Alexandria, VA and the 18th Century Ship Found Below the World Trade Center in New York.. Christopher Dostal. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, NM. 2018 ( tDAR id: 441483)

This Resource is Part of the Following Collections

Keywords

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 443