The Private Side of Victorian Mourning Practices in 19th-century New England: The Cole’s Hill Memorial Cache

Author(s): Nadia Waski; Victoria A Cacchione

Year: 2018

Summary

Excavated from Cole’s Hill in downtown Plymouth, Massachusetts, a cache comprising of a collection of 19th century personal adornment artifacts, daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, and organic materials, potentially provides an alternative view of mourning and memorialization practices in Victorian-era New England. The associated artifacts possess characteristics indicative of Victorian mourning symbols and material types. However, no other current examples of this mourning practice exist in the historical and archaeological records. Thus, this paper will explore how this discovery serves as a way to understand the private side of the traditionally public mourning practices of the Victorian-era.  

Cite this Record

The Private Side of Victorian Mourning Practices in 19th-century New England: The Cole’s Hill Memorial Cache. Nadia Waski, Victoria A Cacchione. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, NM. 2018 ( tDAR id: 441636)

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Keywords

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Individual & Institutional Roles

Contact(s): Society for Historical Archaeology

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 350