Evolving Tools for Public Maritime Archaeology: From Photoshop to Photogrammetry in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary

Summary

Since the establishment of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS) Historic Shipwreck Trail (HST), Indiana University (IU) and NOAA have partnered on periodic site assessments to support management and outreach concerning these cultural and associated biological resources. Over the years evolving technologies have brought new techniques from line-drawn site plans to Photoshop to the advent of Computer Vision Photogrammetry as a tool for comprehensive 3D recording. Accordingly, the NOAA-IU partnership has continued to evolve, most recently by conducting large-scale photogrammetric surveys of three HST sites: the 1733 San Pedro, the 1917 City of Washington, and the 1942 Benwood. In addition to establishing new monitoring baselines with much greater detail and accuracy than was previously possible, the 3D models of these shipwrecks also serve as compelling outreach tools allowing the public to digitally dive into maritime heritage.

Cite this Record

Evolving Tools for Public Maritime Archaeology: From Photoshop to Photogrammetry in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Matthew Maus, Brenda Altmeier, Charles D Beeker, Samuel I. Haskell, Kirsten Hawley. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, NM. 2018 ( tDAR id: 441711)

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Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 970