Maritime (Other Keyword)

1-25 (37 Records)

Archaeological Investigations at Seaside, Oregon an Intermediate Report On the Excavations of Two Major Archaeological Sits At Seaside, Oregon, Through September, 1977 (1979)
DOCUMENT Citation Only George E. Phebus, Jr.. Robert M. Drucker.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Can A Picture Save A Thousand Ships?: Using 3D Photogrammetry To Streamline Maritime Archaeological Recordation And Modeling (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Christopher P. Morris.

In the wake of Superstorm Sandy, massive multi-agency infrastructure projects were undertaken along the Atlantic seaboard to repair the damage. Such projects can have a disastrous effect upon historic resources long since buried. During a large-scale seawall project in Brick Township, NJ, ship timbers, planks, fittings, fastenings, and structural elements were pried from their sites by construction equipment, moved before being stockpiled, and the hole backfilled with sand. This was prior to it...


Cuban Heritage Understanding through Guided Surveys (CHUGS): Establishing a public workshop and database (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Nohe.

Washed up on the Florida shore, the boats that survive the voyage from Cuba are more than a means of transportation; they represent the refugee’s stories of ingenuity and courage. Known as "chugs" due to the sound they make, these boats can be anything from fishing yachts or skiffs, to vernacular vessels that almost defy categorization. These chugs are the physical artifacts of the struggle for political and economic freedom that has propelled thousands to make the dangerous journey over more...


Distribution and Use of Asian Coins As Trade Items On the Northwest Coast of America (1983)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Herbert K. Beals.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Diverse Threats to MAST and its Heritage in Africa : Confronting Historical Amnesia and Salvors; Securing Slim Resources and Social Relevance (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jonathan Sharfman. Justine Benanty. Ricardo Duarte.

In much of the developing world a triumvirate of treasure hunting, politics, and a lack of technical capacity/resources have skewed portrayals of what maritime history is and why it is meaningful. Shipwreck sites in particular have been promoted as the embodiment of the heritage of "the other" with little local relevance. Treasure hunters accordingly go unchecked in their efforts to recover valuable historical cargos—with detrimental effects for the archaeological inventory. This paper will...


Diving for Northwest Relics: Identification and Dating of Bottles, Pottery and Marine Hardware (1979)
DOCUMENT Citation Only James S. White.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Don’t Hold Your Breath – Initiating Community Projects and Public Engagement through an Invested Collaboration in Maritime Archaeology (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Daniel B. Rees.

This project presents perspectives on community engagement and investment in maritime heritage. Focusing on public programs in archaeology, this research speaks to the importance of immersive and interactive learning towards public education on the relevance of maritime history, including the processes and issues associated with excavation, identification, and conservation. The content of this review comes in reflection of Nautical Archaeology Society (NAS) courses and surveys completed on the...


Don’t Hold Your Breath – Initiating Community Projects and Public Engagement through an Invested Collaboration in Maritime Archaeology (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Daniel B. Rees. Chanelle Zaphiropoulos.

This poster presents perspectives on community engagement and investment in maritime heritage. Focusing on public programs in archaeology, this research speaks to the importance of immersive and interactive learning towards public education on the relevance of maritime history, including the processes and issues associated with excavation, identification, and conservation. The content of this review comes in reflection of Nautical Archaeology Society (NAS) courses and surveys completed on the...


Edward Rhodes – His Booke: Examining trade routes, functions and vessel performance through primary source documents (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Scott A. Tucker.

Edward Rhodes was a seventeenth-century sailor involved in the English-Chesapeake tobacco trade. Little is known of his life, aside from a single, but extremely detailed document housed in the Bodleian library in Oxford. From 1670-1676, he kept a book describing his journeys back and forth across the Atlantic in four different ships, keeping information on daily positions and weather, but also functional aspects of trade, deaths aboard the ship, and other information as he saw fit. Daily...


Ethnic Identity And The San Francisco Bay Waterfront During The Mid To Late 19th Century (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David Buckley.

The recent archaeological excavations along the former San Francisco waterfront have provided important insights into the cultural and ethnic identity of waterfront residents and maritime workers in 19th-century San Francisco. Excavations from 201 Folsom Street, 300 Spear Street, and relating to the Transbay Terminal (Block 6) have provided archaeological evidence that can be connected with residents involved in a variety of occupations related to maritime commerce. Historical documents,...


Evolving Tools for Public Maritime Archaeology: From Photoshop to Photogrammetry in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Matthew Maus. Brenda Altmeier. Charles D Beeker. Samuel I. Haskell. Kirsten Hawley.

Since the establishment of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS) Historic Shipwreck Trail (HST), Indiana University (IU) and NOAA have partnered on periodic site assessments to support management and outreach concerning these cultural and associated biological resources. Over the years evolving technologies have brought new techniques from line-drawn site plans to Photoshop to the advent of Computer Vision Photogrammetry as a tool for comprehensive 3D recording. Accordingly, the...


Folklore, Fishing Art, and Free Divers: The Cahuita Community (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only B. Lynn Harris. Kelsey K Dwyer.

Cahuita, a small Afro Caribbean town in southern Costa Rica, boasts a vibrant community of painters, musicians and fishermen. The plethora of colorful murals on buildings, stone statues, lyrics and sounds of calypso and reggae music, small fishing boats and folklore expand the maritime historical narrative. Themes include dramatic stories about shipwrecks and survivors, nature conservation debates, earthquakes, local wildlife, and fishing adventures. The ECU maritime studies team will present an...


Gimballed Beds and Gamming Chairs: Seafaring Wives aboard Nineteenth-Century Sailing Ships (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Laurel Seaborn.

Women lived on sailing ships with their families during the 19th century, and chronicled their experiences in journals and letters now found in historical archives.  Their stories remain on the periphery, as their signature is difficult to find in the maritime archaeological record.  Primary documents make mention of several items built or brought on board specifically for their comfort or entertainment.  Five captain’s wives sailed on the 19th-century whaleship Charles W. Morgan, still afloat...


Indian River United States Life-Saving and Coast Guard Station #142, 1876-1967 + / -, Indian River Inlet, Sussex County, Delaware (1997)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Cindy Gamble. Rebecca Siders.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Indiana’s Maritime Heritage: Ongoing Investigations and Management Strategies for the 1910 Muskegon (aka Peerless) Shipwreck (12LE0381) (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Samuel I. Haskell. Matthew Maus. Charles D Beeker. Kirsten M. Hawley.

Built in 1872 as the Peerless, the Muskegon (12LE0381) was a steamship that operated on the Great Lakes until it was abandoned in 1911. Having functioned as a passenger-freighter, a lumber-hooker, and a sand-sucker during its service, the Muskegon represents important innovations in engineering, commerce, transportation, and industry. Following initial documentation by state archaeologist Gary Ellis in 1987, the Muskegon became the first shipwreck in the State of Indiana to be listed in the...


Lost Harbour Found! Where Sir Francis Drake Really Landed On the West Coast of America, and How He Also Discovered Canada (1981)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Bob Ward.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Managing England’s Protected Wreck Sites (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alison James.

In the ten years since English Heritage assumed some responsibilities for the historic environment of England’s seabed, many advances have been made in the physical management of submerged heritage.   It is an exciting time forEngland’s Protected Wreck site with many new initiatives. A recent development has been the implementation of the Heritage Crime Initiative in the marine environment which is enabling better protection of the sites. The work of Licensees has long been recognised as...


"Marineness" and Variability in Maritime Adaptations in the Late Ceramic Age Northern Lesser Antilles (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only John Crock. Nanny Carder. Sebastián Castro.

Archaeological investigations in the northern Lesser Antilles have demonstrated Amerindians’ dependence on marine foods and maritime exchange throughout the Late Ceramic Age. While these data confirm the assumption that small island populations were, by necessity, maritime adapted, they also reveal subtle variability in the degree to which islanders’ depended on marine resources and the extent to which they engaged in interisland exchange networks. We use environmental and archaeological data to...


Maritime Archaeology on Middle Georgia Rivers, USA (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Stephen A. Hammack.

This paper will discuss research into the maritime history of the three major rivers of the Middle Georgia region. These include the Flint, Ocmulgee, and Oconee Rivers. The aspects addressed will include prehistoric and historic fish weirs and dugout canoes, as well as 18th, 19th, and 20th century poleboats, steamboats, ferries, barges, and other inland watercraft. A summary of fieldwork in the region since 2005 will also be included.


A Maritime Context For Richmond And Environs; Assessment And Recommendations For Future Study (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Bruce Terrell.

The Fall Line at Virginia's James River has drawn people from throughout human history to take advantage of the river's resources for sustenance, transportation and industry and figures in Richmond's establishment and growth over time.Often portrayed as one of North America's most historic waterways, the James' tidewater intersection with the uplands at Richmond has a maritime identity that is not often recognized. Much of the river's historic cultural landscape has been eroded by natural and...


Maritime Households in San Francisco (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mark Walker. Whitney McClellan.

In its work in the neighborhoods in the South of Market area of San Francisco the Anthropological Studies Center of Sonoma State University acquired a database of 14 assemblages from households associated with the maritime sector of San Francisco’s economy. Because of this sector’s centrality within the city’s economy, maritime workers are a dominant element in social and labor histories of the city. They are not, however, so visible in the archaeological record. In this paper, we present recent...


Message in a Breech Block: A Fragmentary Printed Text Recovered from Queen Anne’s Revenge (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Erik R Farrell. Kimberly P Kenyon. Sarah Watkins-Kenney. Kay D. Smith. Ruth R. Brown.

The collection of artefacts recovered from the 1718 wreck of Queen Anne’s Revenge (QAR) contains a broad array of items typical of shipboard life on a pirate vessel, as well as tantalizing, unique finds. While unloading and conserving the breech chamber for a breechloading swivel gun, conservators recovered 16 small fragments of paper, some bearing legible printed text. These fragments of text have been uncovered after nearly 300 years inside a cannon chamber on the sea floor, and conservators...


Nominating Historic Vessels and Shipwrecks to the National Register of Historic Places (1985)
DOCUMENT Citation Only James P. Delgado. National Park Service Maritime Task Force.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


An ‘Old Admiralty Longshank’ Anchor from Admiralty Bay, Washington: The HMS Chatham’s Lost Anchor? (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Scott S Williams.

In 2008 commercial divers discovered an 18th century anchor in 40 feet of water in Admiralty Bay, Puget Sound.  The anchor was recovered under permit in June 2014.  The anchor was set in the bay bottom with one arm embedded in the seafloor, and 165-feet of stud-link anchor chain attached to the shank.  An iron grapnel was hooked to the middle of the chain.  The extension of the chain and the presence of the grapnel indicate the anchor was lost when the cable broke after the anchor was set, and...


The Original Spaghetti Junction: Using Canoe Locations to Trace Routes of an Ancient Transportation Network in Florida (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Julia Byrd.

This paper presents results of spatial analysis on Florida’s 400 dugout canoes recorded in the Florida Bureau of Archaeological Research’s canoe database. Patterned concentrations of canoes located at the edges of basins suggest that prehistoric people had a system of drop-off points, where canoes were left for later use. Such a system is consistent with ethnographically recorded canoe-use practices among indigenous peoples in Florida and beyond. Drop-off points represent important places on the...