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Can A Picture Save A Thousand Ships?: Using 3D Photogrammetry To Streamline Maritime Archaeological Recordation And Modeling

Author(s): Christopher P. Morris

Year: 2016

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Summary

In the wake of Superstorm Sandy, massive multi-agency infrastructure projects were undertaken along the Atlantic seaboard to repair the damage. Such projects can have a disastrous effect upon historic resources long since buried. During a large-scale seawall project in Brick Township, NJ, ship timbers, planks, fittings, fastenings, and structural elements were pried from their sites by construction equipment, moved before being stockpiled, and the hole backfilled with sand. This was prior to it being recognized as historic, and agency notification. With the wreck site no longer accessible, the damaged timbers were the only resource archaeologists have for identification. Full detailed recordation, and attempted rough-fit re-assembly of the damaged, fragile, and oversized timbers was determined by the agencies to be a potentially expensive, time consuming, and dangerous prospect. Can archaeological photogrammetry and 3D modeling, be a safer, more efficient, detailed, and cost effective alternative?


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Cite this Record

Can A Picture Save A Thousand Ships?: Using 3D Photogrammetry To Streamline Maritime Archaeological Recordation And Modeling. Christopher P. Morris. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 435093)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
Historic


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 961

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America