Immersive Technology as Meaningful Interpretation and Public Discourse for Archaeology and History

Author(s): Thomas Whitley

Year: 2018

Summary

We are surrounded these days by endless digital online content that interprets historical and/or archaeological materials for the general public. The resolution and amount of this content is increasing more rapidly than the ripeness of a banana in a brown paper bag. But in many ways, this material seems to represent only the objectives of the archaeologists or historians involved. Being able to digitally re-create, or interpret, the past in new and exciting ways is obviously a good thing. But preservation of historical or archaeological heritage means passing knowledge, not just materials or online content, on to future generations. At Sonoma State, we are beginning to grapple with ideas on how to move from online content as supplemental material to interpret a location, or site, to using it as one tool for larger educational goals and engagement with future generations. Some examples using different techniques are presented here.

Cite this Record

Immersive Technology as Meaningful Interpretation and Public Discourse for Archaeology and History. Thomas Whitley. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, NM. 2018 ( tDAR id: 441892)

This Resource is Part of the Following Collections

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Individual & Institutional Roles

Contact(s): Society for Historical Archaeology

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 338