Of Gila Spiral and Plumed Serpents: the Temporal Sensitivity of Casas Grandes Ceramics

Author(s): Gordon F. M. Rakita; Gerry R. Raymond

Year: 2020

Summary

Arrangements of temporally sequential pottery types have been a backbone of southwestern archaeology for over seventy-five years. Indeed, the region has been the setting for much of the debate over ceramic systematics within Americanist archaeology (Lyman et al. 1997). Since the first Pecos conference in 1927, much of the early archaeological work in the region was explicitly geared towards establishing such ceramic series. In later years, these sequences provided the chronological framework upon which the prehistoric record of the North American desert west was elaborated. Even the rise of the New Archaeology, with its uncompromising critique of the goals and methodology of the preceding paradigm, has not inhibited the continued refinement and application of these ceramic sequences.

Cite this Record

Of Gila Spiral and Plumed Serpents: the Temporal Sensitivity of Casas Grandes Ceramics. Gordon F. M. Rakita, Gerry R. Raymond. 2020 ( tDAR id: 458533) ; doi:10.48512/XCV8458533

This Resource is Part of the Following Collections

Spatial Coverage

min long: -114.653; min lat: 29.918 ; max long: -106.04; max lat: 35.39 ;

Individual & Institutional Roles

Contact(s): Amerind Museum

Record Identifiers

MS(s): 592

File Information

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MS-592.pdf 994.72kb Nov 17, 2020 11:15:38 AM Public