tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

Spring 2004 Architecture Studies at Pueblo La Plata

Part of the Legacies on the Landscape project

Author(s): Karen Schollmeyer

Year: 2004

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

Studies of the architecture of Pueblo La Plata, particularly room construction

sequences, formed one component of the Legacies on the Landscape project research in 2004. The goals of this portion of the project were to improve our understanding of how the pueblo was built, and to gain a sense of population size and changes over time. In particular, we wished to determine whether a sizeable core area of rooms (representing the first construction phase of the pueblo) was visible, and whether the pueblo was constructed all at once, in several large construction episodes, or through the gradual accretion of a few rooms at a time.

This information is of interest for several reasons. Prehistoric human impacts on

the landscape around Pueblo La Plata would have been influenced by the size of its

population. Accurate information about the number of rooms and their sizes is essential in making reliable population estimates. Information on the construction sequence of pueblo rooms may indicate whether most were occupied simultaneously (indicating a large population), whether the population occupying the pueblo grew gradually, or whether different groups of rooms were used at different times during the pueblo’s occupation (indicating a smaller population at any given time). This information also has implications for how access to landscape resources was organized, as the earliest residents may have had access to different resources or have had lower resource demands (as a smaller group) than later populations occupying the pueblo.


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections


Cite this Record

Spring 2004 Architecture Studies at Pueblo La Plata. Karen Schollmeyer. 2004 ( tDAR id: 5922) ; doi:10.6067/XCV8D50KKG


Keywords


Temporal Coverage

Calendar Date: 1200 to 1450


Spatial Coverage

min long: -112.162; min lat: 34.079 ; max long: -111.907; max lat: 34.296 ;

Individual & Institutional Roles

Contributor(s): Arizona State University, Department of Anthropology

Landowner(s): Bureau of Land Management


File Information

  Name Size Creation Date Date Uploaded Access
la-plata-architecture-spring-2004.pdf 1.08mb Feb 22, 2011 1:08:17 PM Public
Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America