Starch Grain (Material Keyword)

1-15 (15 Records)

Plant Microfossils Recovered from Dental Calculus at Casas Grandes, Mexico (2016)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Daniel King. Michael Searcy. Kyle Waller.

Microfossil analysis is a technique used to better understand prehistoric diets. As part of a larger multinational project, we gathered and analyzed 112 samples of dental calculus (fossilized plaque) from human remains discovered at Paquimé and other sites in the Casas Grandes river valley to identify various microfossils still present in the silica matrix. With this information, we are able to better understand the flora present during ancient times and how it was used (food, processing, etc.).


Putting Archaeobotany Under the Microscope: A Case Study for Increased Use of Starch-Grain Residue Analysis on the North Coast of Peru (2015)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Guy Duke. Victor Vásquez-Sanchez. Teresa Rosales-Tham.

Due to the arid environment and subsequent excellent preservation on the north coast of Peru, evidence obtained from macrobotanical remains here has been the primary sources of information on plant use. However, despite the richness of the macrobotanical record, the combination of arid conditions and the nature of many plants, such as potatoes and beans – which are consumed in their entirety – macrobotanical remains can only tell us so much. In this paper, we discuss some methodological issues...


Real Alto Supplementary Figure 1: Structure 1 images (2019)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Deborah M. Pearsall.

Real Alto Supplementary Figure 1: Structure 1 images


Real Alto Supplementary Figure 2: Structure 10 images (2019)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Deborah M. Pearsall.

Images of microfossils recovered from stone tools from Structure 10, Real Alto, Ecuador


Real Alto Supplementary Figure 3: Structure 20 images tools (2019)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Uploaded by: Deborah M. Pearsall

Images of microfossils recovered from stone tools from Structure 20, Real Alto, Ecuador


Real Alto Supplementary Figure 4: Structure 20 images sediments (2019)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Deborah M. Pearsall.

Images of microfossils recovered from sediment samples from Structure 20, Real Alto, Ecuador


Real Alto Supplementary Figure 5: Charnal House Mound images (2019)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Deborah M. Pearsall.

Microfossil images from stone tools from Charnal House Mound structures, Real Alto, Ecuador


Real Alto Supplementary Figure 6: Dental Calculus images (2019)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Deborah M. Pearsall.

Microfossil images from dental calculus samples, Real Alto, Ecuador


Real Alto Supplementary Table 1: Pearsall 1979 wood data (2019)
DATASET Deborah M. Pearsall.

Charred wood (macroremains) from Real Alto, Ecuador


Real Alto Supplementary Table 2: Structure 1 microfossil data (2019)
DATASET Deborah M. Pearsall.

Microfossil data from Structure 1 tools, Real Alto, Ecuador


Real Alto Supplementary Table 3: Structure 10 microfossil data (2019)
DATASET Deborah M. Pearsall.

Microfossil data from stone tools from Structure 10, Real Alto, Ecuador


Real Alto Supplementary Table 4: Structure 20 microfossil data (2019)
DATASET Deborah M. Pearsall.

Microfossil data from stone tools and floor sediments from Structure 20, Real Alto, Ecuador


Real Alto Supplementary Table 5: Charnal House Mound microfossil data (2019)
DATASET Deborah M. Pearsall.

Microfossil data from stone tools from Charnal House Mound structures, Real Alto, Ecuador


Real Alto Supplementary Table 6: Dental Calculus microfossil data (2019)
DATASET Deborah M. Pearsall.

Microfossil data from dental calculus samples, Real Alto, Ecuador


Supplementary information files, Food and Society at Real Alto, an Early Formative Community in Southwest Coastal Ecuador
PROJECT Deborah M. Pearsall.

LAA article abstract: We investigate foodways at Real Alto, an early Formative (4400 to 1800 BC) Valdivia site in coastal Ecuador, through starch and phytoliths recovered from 50 stone tools from three residential and two ceremonial structures, and from 46 human dentitions, and consider how food reflects social relationships and economy of the community. Maize was important in daily meals and ceremonial foods by Middle Valdivia (2800-2400 BC), but only one component of an agricultural system...