Teaching (Other Keyword)

1-22 (22 Records)

Archaeological Ceramics for Beginners: A Hands-On Activity for Introductory Classes (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Benjamin Carter.

This activity is designed for students who have little or no experience with archaeology and, in many ways, is a classic; archaeological ceramics activities or labs are offered at many institutions. So, why offer it up? For two reasons: first, as a well-proven option that new instructors can use in their classrooms that is explicitly connected to the Principles for Curricular Reform and, second, as a starter for conversations with experienced instructors. The activity engages students with a...


Archaeological Ceramics for Beginners: A Hands-On Activity for Introductory Classes
PROJECT Uploaded by: Benjamin Carter

This activity is designed for students who have little or no experience with archaeology and, in many ways, is a classic; archaeological ceramics activities or labs are offered at many institutions. So, why offer it up? For two reasons: first, as a well-proven option that new instructors can use in their classrooms that is explicitly connected to the Principles for Curricular Reform and, second, as a starter for conversations with experienced instructors. The activity engages students with a...


Archaeology is Appealing: Collaborative Approaches to Foster Public Engagement with the Past (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kari L Lentz. Kate O'Donnell. Stephanie Stewart-Bailey.

The technology industry is rapidly transforming the social and physical landscape of San Francisco. While the city’s zeitgeist is orientated toward the future, archaeologists labor to recover and record its vanishing history. The enormous scale of construction has resulted in an unprecedented volume of artifacts and data that all too often languish on shelves and in gray literature. Budget crunches and curation crises have led to cooperation with institutions at the forefront of public...


Capstones and Competency across the Anthropology Major: Assessment of Student Learning with an Archaeological Case Study (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Melinda Leach. Elizabeth Scharf. Ann Reed.

In this poster, we examine ways in which an archaeological case study can usefully serve multiple purposes in the assessment of undergraduate student learning. In the context of our senior capstone course, we have developed a three-tiered assessment plan for examining effective learning outcomes at the course, program and general education ("Essential Studies") levels. The assignment, based on real events and surrounding controversy, asks our capstone students to reflect deeply on ethical...


Collections as a Teaching Resource: A Case Study (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Elanor Sonderman. Crystal Dozier.

The Anthropology Department at Texas A&M University has an extensive but largely underutilized collection of unprovenienved artifacts, intended for use as teaching collections. Many of these materials have diagnostic attributes but have not gone through the typing process and, therefore, cannot yet be fully incorporated into the teaching collections. The authors have designed several projects for students in introductory archaeology and old world prehistory courses that give these students the...


Construction and Uses of a Laboratory Archaeological Site (1964)
DOCUMENT Citation Only John M. Chilcott. James J. Deetz.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


The Curriculum Committee’s New Curriculum Resource (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Justin Williams. Nancy Gonlin. Leah McCurdy.

When teaching archaeology, professors are tasked with the difficult undertaking of conveying the essence of a hands-on field that often must be taught within the confines of the classroom. This restriction can make creating effective classroom activities and all-inclusive syllabi a challenge. Adding to the difficulty is the emphasis that research receives at conferences. Latest findings from the field are the focus rather than innovative pedagogy. The SAA’s Principles of Archaeological Ethics...


Det store norske knakkesteinprosjektet presenterer: kankkesteinmassakeren (2009)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lotte Eigeland. E Hansen. Laura Longo.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the EXARC Bibliography, originally compiled by Roeland Paardekooper, and updated. Most of these records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us using the...


Effective use of site reports as pedagogical tools in courses on Environmental Archaeology and Archaeoastronomy (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Victor Fisher.

Requiring students to analyze individual site reports in terms of theoretical schemes presented in lectures has yielded very positive results. Students have come away from this experience with excellent comprehension of both the site reports and difficulties involved in fitting the data contained therein to a theoretical framework. SAA 2015 abstracts made available in tDAR courtesy of the Society for American Archaeology and Center for Digital Antiquity Collaborative Program to improve digital...


Mentorship, Professionalism, and the MSU Campus Archaeology Program (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Terry Brock.

In 2008, Lynne Goldstein founded the Michigan State University Campus Archaeology Program. I had the opportunity to serve as the first Campus Archaeologist, a position that I thought would give me much needed experience in conducting and leading archaeological excavations. In addition to this, I ended up learning more about becoming a complete professional and public archaeologist, the intangible skills that are so difficult to teach, but that Dr. Goldstein has bestowed upon many of her students...


Nød lærer naken kvinne å spinne – men hva med flinthuggeren? Et eksperiment om læringsprocesser i flinthugging (2009)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lotte Eigeland. Laura Longo.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the EXARC Bibliography, originally compiled by Roeland Paardekooper, and updated. Most of these records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us using the...


Reflections on Teaching and Assessing Student Learning in Introductory Archaeology (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Elizabeth Scharf. Melinda Leach.

In this presentation, we present several of the means that we have used to collect data on student learning and the student experience in our introductory archaeology classes. Standardized institutional student evaluation forms, learning-response surveys, instructor-generated evaluation forms, hands-on lab activities, assignments, pre- and post-semester surveys (the "knowledge surveyor"), and evaluation of student products with rubrics will be described and discussed, along with their roles in...


Resources For the Teaching of Anthropology (1963)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David G. Mandelbaum. Gabriel W. Lasker. Ethel M. Albert.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Schools and Public Archaeology: Igniting a Commitment to Heritage Preservation (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Charles White.

Schools are a natural and potentially fruitful venue for public archaeology efforts; natural, because cultural transmission is a fundamental purpose of schooling, and potentially fruitful, given the nearly 50 million students currently enrolled in K-12 schools (National Center for Education Statistics, 2015). Schools are also a target audience of enormous importance to public archaeology, largely because the goals of heritage preservation depend on the formation of durable habits of mind and...


Tales From the Front Line: Politics, Teaching, and Museum Collections (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Giovanna Vitelli.

The tensions between stewardship, scholarship and access to collections often play out on a local scale, as contests for funding and resources. Cultivating support and funding for the long-term needs of a museum or repository is a fight for recognition of their value, and takes place in the corridors of power and among people who serve a bigger cause.Aligning with university strategic plans and policies has limited traction unless we do the work and demonstrate how collections are of central...


Teaching Archaeology through Games: Bringing Interactive Lessons into the Classroom (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Justin Williams.

When teaching archaeology, it may sometimes be challenging to incorporate group work and interactive lesson plans. Due to the sensitive and time consuming nature of archaeological field and lab work, it is difficult to provide a true archaeological experience during allotted class periods. One way in which archaeological lesson plans can become more interactive is through the use of board games. Board games provide an interactive activity which causes students to work together, and the rules can...


Teaching Bones from my Garden (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only John Whittaker.

Few of my students have much experience with hunting, farming, anatomy, or even eating meat these days, so teaching faunal analysis labs in an Archaeological Field Methods class can be difficult. Faunal assemblages from archaeological sites are often small, fragile, and too valuable for class use. They require good comparative collections, and it may be difficult for students to relate to unfamiliar animals and cultures. A faunal teaching assemblage can be produced from home meat consumption....


Teaching of Anthropology (1963)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David G. Mandelbaum. Gabriel W. Lasker. Ethel M. Albert.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Teaching on the Down-Low: presenting queer theory to a broad audience (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jo Burkholder.

Because we so often think about archaeological theory as something for "advanced" students, and gender and queer theory still regularly get little 'air-time' in most courses, it is unusual to introduce students to these perspectives at the level of general education and introductory course work. Personal experience in teaching Archaeology of Gender in two religiously conservative states - Kentucky and Wisconsin - over the last 15 years suggests that there are ways in which we can move students...


Teaching Without a Wreck: Using Museum Collections in the Classroom (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michelle M. Damian.

Spring 2016 marked the first time maritime archaeology was taught to undergraduates at Harvard University. No diving was required for this introductory class, so in order to give the students the experience of researching and identifying a "wreck site" the class partnered with the Peabody Museum of Anthropology and Ethnology. The museum collection contained a number of models that were not on display due to space constraints. The class therefore used the museum ship models as substitutes for an...


Training Public Archaeologists: Shaping the Future of Archaeology (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Terry Brock.

This is an abstract from the "Training Public Archaeologists: Shaping the Future of Archaeology" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. In the closing remarks of his 2017 Presidential Address, SHA President Joe Joseph reminded us to "be public archaeologists first, historical archaeologists second." Such a proclamation reflects the growing need for archaeologists to be publicly facing with their work, whether that be through daily interactions, museums,...


"A True Sign of Learning": What College Students Learn About Teaching and Learning from a Museum Docent Program (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Larkin Hood.

Burke 101 is a museum program developed to provide undergraduate students at the University of Washington an opportunity to share their knowledge in a particular discipline. The program is organized around a course in which students work together to create hands-on, interactive activities for visitors using museum specimens. Observations of students’ interactions with visitors as well as analysis of student oral and written reflections indicate that initially students find their teaching...