La Ciudad (Site Name Keyword)

1-19 (19 Records)

Archaeology in the Distribution Division of the Central Arizona Project: Thoughts on the History of the Hohokam Culture of Southern Arizona and on the Practice of Archaeology in the 1990s (1995)
DOCUMENT Full-Text William S. Marmaduke. Kathleen T. Henderson.

Underwritten by the Bureau of Reclamation, Northland Research archaeologists surveyed more than 7,450 hectares (18,410 acres) of southern Arizona. Two hundred four archaeological sites were recorded. Some sites, but not many, were historic in age; a few were Archaic, from the era before ceramics and sedentary agriculture in the Southwestern lowlands. The majority were from the intervening Hohokam cultural sequence. We learned from these sites that the prehistory of southern Arizona is, at one...


Ceramic Markers of Ancient Irrigation Communities (2002)
DOCUMENT Full-Text David R. Abbott.

More than 1000 years ago, a people that archaeologists call the Hohokam first inhabited the deserts of what is now Arizona. They flourished for more than 70 generations in the lower Salt River Valley, the place where Phoenix now stands. Buried beneath the modern metropolis are the ruins of many aboriginal villages and a vast and elaborate irrigation network that may have watered 40,000 acres of cropland. (Jerry Howard completed this map, Figure 1, of the Hohokam irrigation canals and major...


Death, Society and Ideology in a Hohokam Community: Colonial and Sedentary Period Burials from La Ciudad (1987)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Randall H. McGuire.

The nature of Hohokam social organization has always been at the core of debates surrounding the prehistory of southern Arizona. Changing theoretical perspectives have shifted the directions and foci of controversy but the differences in these orientations can largely be described in terms of the assumptions made about social organization. A continuing thread to the arguments has been disagreement over the nature of power relationships in Hohokam society and the importance of such relationships...


Frank Midvale's Investigation of the Site of La Ciudad (1987)
DOCUMENT Full-Text David R. Wilcox.

La Ciudad Phoenix was one of numerous Hohokam Indian villages that once were located about every three miles (4.8 kilometers) along extensive irrigation canals in the Salt and Gila river valleys. First founded in the early centuries A.D., La Ciudad endured for a millennium or more, evolving new forms of organization to meet life’s challenges on several scales of interaction, only to fail in the end when the Hohokam abandoned the Phoenix basin about A.D. 1450. The more archaeologists learn about...


A Gazetteer of Excavated Hohokam Sites on Canal System Two, Phoenix Basin, Arizona (2002)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Glen E. Rice.

From 1982 to 1990, a dozen archaeological sites associated with the Hohokam Canal System Two in the Phoenix Basin were excavated in anticipation of the construction of a network of freeways in the City of Phoenix (Figure 1). Ten of the excavation projects were funded through the Arizona Department of Transportation and two through the City of Phoenix Engineering Project; the work was conducted by the Arizona State Museum, the Museum of Northern Arizona, Arizona State University, and Soil...


The Geophysical Survey at La Ciudad (1980)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Uploaded by: Bruce Bevan

An exploration of downtown Phoenix with radar and EM for Ron Yablon and Don Weaver (Museum of Northern Arizona).


The Hohokam Community of La Ciudad (1987)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Uploaded by: Joshua Watts

In 1982, the Arizona Department of Transportation awarded a contract to the Office of Cultural Resource Management at Arizona State University for a data recovery program in the northern resource zone (Rice and Most 1982). Funding was provided through the Federal Highway Administration as part of a project to mitigate the impacts associated with the construction of the Papago-Loop of the I-10 Interstate Freeway. Our investigations were focused in the northern portion of the site in an area...


Hohokam Impacts on the Vegetation of Canal System Two, Phoenix Basin (2002)
DOCUMENT Full-Text David Jacobs. Glen E. Rice.

In 1850, the Phoenix Basin had been uninhabited for about 350 to 400 years. It was visited occasionally by hunting, fishing, or gathering parties from the Pima, Pee Posh, Yavapai or Apache, but the last people to have cleared farming fields, excavated canals, and built villages in the lower Salt River valley had been the Hohokam, and they had abandoned the area sometime between A.D. 1450 and 1500. This timeline is important to archaeologists because it means that the desert vegetation in the...


La Ciudad Canals: A Study of Hohokam Irrigation Systems at the Community Level (1987)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Neal W. Ackerly. Jerry B. Howard. Randall H. McGuire.

The nineteenth-century farmers, merchants, and prospectors who settled in the Salt River Valley of Arizona encountered one of the most dense and most visible concentrations of prehistoric ruins in North America. They named their new city Phoenix because they envisioned it rising up from the ashes of the prehistoric Hohokam culture. One of the most pronounced features discovered was large irrigation canals that stretched across most of the valley floor--an ancient irrigation network, the...


The Lower Verde Archaeological Project
PROJECT Jeffrey A. Homburg. Richard Ciolek-Torrello. Jeffrey H. Altschul. Stephanie M. Whittlesey. Steven D. Shelley. USDI Bureau of Reclamation, Phoenix Area Office.

The Lower Verde Archaeological Project (LVAP) was a four-year data recovery project conducted by Statistical Research, Inc. (SRI) in the lower Verde River region of central Arizona. The project was designed to mitigate any adverse effects to cultural resources from modifications to Horseshoe and Bartlett Dams. The Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Arizona Project’s Office sponsored the research program in compliance with historic preservation legislation. The LVAP’s...


The Operation and Evolution of an Irrigation System: The East Papago Canal Study (1991)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Jerry B. Howard. Gary Huckleberry.

Archaeological investigations sponsored by the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) were conducted by Soil Systems, Inc. (SSI) at several sites within the East Papago Freeway corridor, including El Caserío (AZ T:12:49(ASM)), La Lomita (AZ U:9:67(ASM)), and La Lomita Pequeña (AZ U:9:66(ASM)). During the investigation of these sites, a significant number of canal alignments were encountered, prompting the sponsoring of the East Papago Canal Study by ADOT. Canal System 2, traversed by the...


Phoenix Basin Archaeology: Intersections, Pathways Through Time
PROJECT Uploaded by: Joshua Watts

The Intersections project is an electronic archive of the archaeological monographs written for archaeological projects conducted at Hohokam sites on Canal System Two and funded by the Federal and Arizona departments of transportation. The searchable electronic archive includes the contents of about 37 separate volumes reporting on the findings of 11 different archaeological projects. The Intersections project was funded by the Federal Highway Administration through the Arizona Department of...


Prehistoric Irrigation in Arizona: Symposium 1988 (1991)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Uploaded by: Joshua Watts

Studies of Hohokam irrigation systems undertaken in the past 5 to 10 years, particularly in the Phoenix Basin, have provided a wealth of new data to be studied and assimilated by archaeologists. Recently completed and ongoing projects have required archaeologists to ask new questions and to apply a variety of investigative techniques to better understand the complexities of Hohokam irrigation systems. It is important that archaeologists studying Hohokam irrigation systems evaluate the increasing...


A Spatial Analysis of the Hohokam Community of La Ciudad (1987)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Glen E. Rice.

Of the many valleys in the southern desert of Arizona, the prehistoric Hohokam concentrated the largest and greatest of their communities in the Phoenix basin. It was here that they constructed the most elaborate and extensive of their canal networks. Their success drew on two unique characteristics of the basin environment. The first was the Salt River; the most competent and consistent source of water in the southern desert, it surpasses five-fold the volume and capacity of the Gila River to...


Specialized Studies in the Economy, Environment and Culture of La Ciudad Part III (1987)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Uploaded by: Joshua Watts

This volume presents the results of a set of diverse studies into special data sets from the site of La Ciudad. La Ciudad is one of the large Hohokam ruins within the network of prehistoric irrigation canals in the Phoenix basin (Figure A). It lies on the north side of the Salt River, midway along a canal system that originates at Pueblo Grande and extends a distance of seven miles to Las Colinas. La Ciudad is composed of multiple loci dispersed along the banks of four canals, and covers about...


Specialized Studies in the Economy, Environment and Culture of La Ciudad Parts I and II (1987)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Uploaded by: Joshua Watts

This volume presents the results of a set of diverse studies into special data sets from the site of La Ciudad. La Ciudad is one of the large Hohokam ruins within the network of prehistoric irrigation canals in the Phoenix basin (Figure A). It lies on the north side of the Salt River, midway along a canal system that originates at Pueblo Grande and extends a distance of seven miles to Las Colinas. La Ciudad is composed of multiple loci dispersed along the banks of four canals, and covers...


STARCH ANALYSIS OF SAMPLES FROM LA CIUDAD, AZ T:12:1 (ASM), PHOENIX, ARIZONA (2013)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Linda Scott Cummings.

La Ciudad (AZ T:12:1[AMS]), a large and complex Hohokam village, is situated within the north-central portion of the Phoenix Basin. This site is located on the lower alluvial fan of Camelback Mountain with Papago Butte to the east and the Salt River to the south. Ten soil samples from pit house and hearth feature contexts of Locus 2 and 3 were submitted for starch analysis.


Structure and Organization at La Ciudad (1987)
DOCUMENT Full-Text T. Kathleen Henderson.

The last decade has seen a quantum leap in our understanding of the Hohokam. From those first days of defining the Hohokam as a cultural entity, great strides have been taken in describing their subsistence and settlement systems, explicating core-periphery relationships, and modeling the processes of Hohokam development, expansion, and decline. And yet, the old adage “the faster we go, the further behind we get” seems particularly descriptive of the current state of Hohokam archaeology. While...


Vanishing River Volume 4: Chapter 04: An Overview of Research History and Archaeology of Central Arizona (1997)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Stephanie M. Whittlesey.

In Chapter 4, Whittlesey presents a thorough summary of archaeological research and intellectual history in central Arizona. The author's goal is to situate the LVAP research in the context of central Arizona archaeology. Whittlesey provides histories of the research that has been conducted in the Verde drainage, the Tonto Basin, the Agua Fria drainage, and the Phoenix Basin. She concludes with a summary of the research trajectories and the different explanatory models applied to central...