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Schoolhouse Point Mesa Data: Decorated Ceramics from All Contexts

Creator(s): Office of Cultural Resource Management, Arizona State University

Year: 1997

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Summary

The Schoolhouse Point Mesa archaeological sites are part of an extensive settlement system on the southern banks of the Salt River. The Arizona State University, Office of Cultural Resource Management, Roosevelt Platform Mound Study (RPMS) divided the Schoolhouse Point Mesa settlement complex into two groups: the Schoolhouse Management Group and the Livingston Management Group. The Schoolhouse Management Group includes those sites on the west side of Pinto Creek Wash, while the Livingston Management Group includes sites on the east side of the wash. Schoolhouse Point Mound (AZ U:8:24(ASM), AR-03-12-06-13a(USFS)) is the largest site in the Schoolhouse Management Group and on the mesa. The mound is treated in a separate report volume and its data are reported separately (Please see https://core.tdar.org/project/394037). The Schoolhouse Point Mesa report volumes and data document the remaining 23 archaeological sites in the Schoolhouse Management Group. Nineteen of the sites are located on the mesa, while four are west of the mesa on the terraces overlooking the Salt River.

The Schoolhouse Point Mesa table Decorated Ceramics from All Contexts presents a summary of decorated ceramic vessels recovered from all investigated contexts (both screened and unscreened) at Schoolhouse Point Mesa (except Schoolhouse Point Mound, which is reported separately).

The table lists archaeological sites designated by Arizona State Museum (ASM) site numbers (without the "AZ" common to all ASM numbers) (e.g., U:8:205 = ASM site number AZ U:8:205). It then lists designated archaeological contexts - strata - at each site. The strata represent major natural or cultural depositional events such as erosional fill, roof fall, floor contexts, and sterile substrate. Strata are depicted as horizontal rows of interconnected boxes on a Harris Matrix. In this table, the archaeological contexts - strata - are identified by a combination of numbering systems: the ASM site number, a colon, the feature number, and the stratum letter designation (EX: U:3:198:006A, U:3:198:006B). Within a feature, each stratum is designated by the feature number (e.g., 10, 11, 12, etc.) and a letter that designates a particular stratum (e.g., A, B, C). The letters are assigned in descending order. Mixed levels and artifacts collected out of context are designated by a "?". Artifacts from each feature (or mixed context) are tallied according to strata. Please see column metadata for further detail. Please also see the Schoolhouse Point Mesa strata data tables for further data about each stratum, including the assigned stratum type, at the following tDAR urls:

https://core.tdar.org/dataset/394455

https://core.tdar.org/dataset/394457

https://core.tdar.org/dataset/394458

https://core.tdar.org/dataset/394376

The table then provides the frequency (count) of individual vessels assigned to different decorated ceramic types for each stratum. Note that the table presents a count of individual vessels (i.e., groups of sherds or single sherds assigned to individual vessels) identified to decorated ceramic type. More specifically, it presents a count of rim sherds that were assigned to a single vessel (The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds to determine ceramic type for individually designated vessels).

The Schoolhouse Point Mesa Data tables were originally published in the Roosevelt Platform Mound Monograph Series No. 8 titled "The Archaeology of Schoolhouse Point Mesa, Roosevelt Platform Mound Study: Report on the Schoolhouse Point Mesa Sites, Schoolhouse Management Group, Pinto Creek Complex." The tables were published in an appendix at the end of the volume. Please see the report volume at the following tDAR URL: https://core.tdar.org/document/394293


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Cite this Record

Schoolhouse Point Mesa Data: Decorated Ceramics from All Contexts. Office of Cultural Resource Management, Arizona State University. Tempe, Arizona: Office of Cultural Resource Management, Arizona State University. 1997 ( tDAR id: 394469) ; doi:10.6067/XCV8W097ZM


Data Set Structure

Measurement Column
Count Column
Coded Column
Filename Column
Integration Column (has Ontology)

Table Information: shmesa_all_decorated

Column Name Data Type Type Category Coding Sheet Ontology
Pinto B/R Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Salado Wares (Roosevelt Red Wares), Pinto Black-on-red. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Pinto Poly. Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Salado Wares (Roosevelt Red Wares), Pinto Polychrome. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Tonto Poly. Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Salado Wares (Roosevelt Red Wares), Tonto Polychrome. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Gila B/R Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Salado Wares (Roosevelt Red Wares), Gila Black-on-red. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Gila Poly. Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Salado Wares (Roosevelt Red Wares), Gila Polychrome. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Gila or Tonto Poly. Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Salado Wares (Roosevelt Red Wares), Gila or Tonto Polychrome. These sherds displayed stylistic elements that were difficult to distinguish between types Gila and Tonto Polychrome. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Cibola White Ware Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware Cibola White Ware. Rim sherd stylistic elements could not be identified to a type. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Reserve B/W Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Cibola White Ware, Reserve Black-on-white. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels. The Reserve design style was in used in multiple ceramic wares across the American Southwest through time. The Reserve stylistic tradition (also called Wingate) was defined by the following characteristics (A Laboratory Plan for Salado Research, pp. 3-34 -- 3-36): multiple line widths opposed solid and hatched elements that interlock where hatched units are always much wider than solid elements diagonal hatching no elaboration on linework.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Tularosa B/W Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Cibola White Ware, Tularosa Black-on-White. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels. The Tularosa design style was in used in multiple ceramic wares across the American Southwest through time. The Tularosa stylistic tradition was defined by the following characteristics (A Laboratory Plan for Salado Research, pp. 3-34 -- 3-36): multiple line widths opposed solid and hatched elements where hatched elements are nearly the same width as solid elements parallel, diagonal and mixed hatching no elaboration on linework band designs are not divided into sections
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Puerco B/W Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Cibola White Ware, Puerco Black-on-White. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels. The Puerco design style was in used in multiple ceramic wares across the American Southwest through time. The Puerco stylistic tradition was defined by the following characteristics (A Laboratory Plan for Salado Research, pp. 3-34 -- 3-36): design in multiple line widths negative geometric elements (parallelograms, checker boards) band decoration separated by vertical lines solid & hatched elements which do not interlock some line elaboration
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Snowflake B/W Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Cibola White Ware, Snowflake Black-on-white. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Pinedale B/W Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Cibola White Ware, Pinedale Black-on-white. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels. The Pinedale design style was in used in multiple ceramic wares across the American Southwest through time. The Pinedale stylistic tradition was defined by the following characteristics (A Laboratory Plan for Salado Research, pp. 3-34 -- 3-36): multiple line widths large opposed solid & hatched interlocking elements (whole design field) solid elements equal in size to hatched elements edges of linear motifs show complicated steps & barbs. internal elaboration of triangular, curvilinear, and rectangular motifs with dots, dotted lines, parallel lines, and squiggled lines double banding lines small pendant birds or parrots emerge from elaborate triangles on some Cedar Creek Poly, framing lines are twice as wide as hatchure
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
White Mountain Red Ware Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware White Mountain Red Ware. Rim sherd stylistic elements could not be identified to a type. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Wingate B/R Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type White Ware Mountain Red Ware, Wingate Black-on-red. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Wingate Poly. Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type White Mountain Red Ware, Wingate Polychrome. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Pinedale B/R Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type White Mountain Red Ware, Pinedale Black-on-red. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels. The Pinedale design style was in used in multiple ceramic wares across the American Southwest through time.The Pinedale stylistic tradition was defined by the following characteristics (A Laboratory Plan for Salado Research, pp. 3-34 -- 3-36): multiple line widths large opposed solid & hatched interlocking elements (whole design field) solid elements equal in size to hatched elements edges of linear motifs show complicated steps & barbs. internal elaboration of triangular, curvilinear, and rectangular motifs with dots, dotted lines, parallel lines, and squiggled lines double banding lines small pendant birds or parrots emerge from elaborate triangles on some Cedar Creek Poly, framing lines are twice as wide as hatchure
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Pinedale Poly. Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type White Mountain Red Ware, Pinedale Polychrome. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels. The Pinedale design style was in used in multiple ceramic wares across the American Southwest through time.The Pinedale stylistic tradition was defined by the following characteristics (A Laboratory Plan for Salado Research, pp. 3-34 -- 3-36): multiple line widths large opposed solid & hatched interlocking elements (whole design field) solid elements equal in size to hatched elements edges of linear motifs show complicated steps & barbs. internal elaboration of triangular, curvilinear, and rectangular motifs with dots, dotted lines, parallel lines, and squiggled lines double banding lines small pendant birds or parrots emerge from elaborate triangles on some Cedar Creek Poly, framing lines are twice as wide as hatchure
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Cedar Creek Poly. Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type White Mountain Red Ware, Cedar Creek Polychrome. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Fourmile Poly. Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type White Mountain Red Ware, Fourmile Polychrome. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels. The Fourmile design style was in used in multiple ceramic wares across the American Southwest through time.The Fourmile stylistic tradition was defined by the following characteristics (A Laboratory Plan for Salado Research, pp. 3-34 -- 3-36): whole design focuses on center of field (rather than whole field) layouts lack bilateral symmetry framing lines are always broader than hatching lines rare interlocked solid and hatched elements no double banding lines most motifs are black and have white outlines units with complicated edges do not oppose and interlock with a similarly shaped unit Internal elaboration of primary motifs using parallel hatched units, stepped line fillers, negative stepped units, and occasionally patches of white large biomorphic figures (birds) broad band in bowls retained below rim
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Hohokam Buff Ware Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware Hohokam Red-on-buff Wares. Rim sherd stylistic elements could not be identified to a type. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels. Rather distinct Hohokam design styles were used in multiple ceramic wares in the Hohokam area through time. The Hohokam stylistic tradition was divided into three temporally-based traditions - the Hohokam Colonial, Sedentary, and Classic periods. The characteristics of the Hohokam Colonial, Hohokam Sedentary, and Hohokam Classic stylistic traditions are as follows (A Laboratory Plan for Salado Research, pp. 3-34 -- 3-36): HOHOKAM COLONIAL fine line execution, good paint hatching used as background, zig–zag line hature a multitude of animal, bird, and human motifs and elements (dancing figures, burden carriers, flute players, birds (in positive & negative) reptiles, and quadrapeds) trailing lines on bowl exteriors (exterior grooving of paste) HOHOKAM SEDENTARY some what sloppy, freely–executed curvilinear motifs scrolls, linework with equlateral triangles, bumps and hatchure common small elements occur (Hohokam “alphabet” as well as circles, dots, birds, animals) Equilateral triangular areas filled w/paint have “bulls eyes” lots of paint covers design field leaving relatively small amounts of undecorated area HOHOKAM CLASSIC good to poor line execution, poor–fugitive paint possible (buffs especially) general rectilinear shape of motifs & elements complex “woven” symmetry of layout commonly truncated as band designs line work elaboration has elongated triangles pendant dots, triangles with flags, hatchure vertical hatchure separates panels of bands areas of checker boards and crosshature incorporated into whole design
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Sacaton R/buff Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Hohokam Red-on-buff, Sacaton Red-on-buff. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels. Rather distinct Hohokam design styles were used in multiple ceramic wares in the Hohokam area through time. The Hohokam stylistic tradition was divided into three temporally-based traditions - the Hohokam Colonial, Sedentary, and Classic periods. The characteristics of the Hohokam Colonial, Hohokam Sedentary, and Hohokam Classic stylistic traditions are as follows (A Laboratory Plan for Salado Research, pp. 3-34 -- 3-36): HOHOKAM COLONIAL fine line execution, good paint hatching used as background, zig–zag line hature a multitude of animal, bird, and human motifs and elements (dancing figures, burden carriers, flute players, birds (in positive & negative) reptiles, and quadrapeds) trailing lines on bowl exteriors (exterior grooving of paste) HOHOKAM SEDENTARY some what sloppy, freely–executed curvilinear motifs scrolls, linework with equlateral triangles, bumps and hatchure common small elements occur (Hohokam “alphabet” as well as circles, dots, birds, animals) Equilateral triangular areas filled w/paint have “bulls eyes” lots of paint covers design field leaving relatively small amounts of undecorated area HOHOKAM CLASSIC good to poor line execution, poor–fugitive paint possible (buffs especially) general rectilinear shape of motifs & elements complex “woven” symmetry of layout commonly truncated as band designs line work elaboration has elongated triangles pendant dots, triangles with flags, hatchure vertical hatchure separates panels of bands areas of checker boards and crosshature incorporated into whole design
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Casa Grande R/buff Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Hohokam Red-on-buff, Casa Grande Red-on-buff. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels. Rather distinct Hohokam design styles were used in multiple ceramic wares in the Hohokam area through time. The Hohokam stylistic tradition was divided into three temporally-based traditions - the Hohokam Colonial, Sedentary, and Classic periods. The characteristics of the Hohokam Colonial, Hohokam Sedentary, and Hohokam Classic stylistic traditions are as follows (A Laboratory Plan for Salado Research, pp. 3-34 -- 3-36): HOHOKAM COLONIAL fine line execution, good paint hatching used as background, zig–zag line hature a multitude of animal, bird, and human motifs and elements (dancing figures, burden carriers, flute players, birds (in positive & negative) reptiles, and quadrapeds) trailing lines on bowl exteriors (exterior grooving of paste) HOHOKAM SEDENTARY some what sloppy, freely–executed curvilinear motifs scrolls, linework with equlateral triangles, bumps and hatchure common small elements occur (Hohokam “alphabet” as well as circles, dots, birds, animals) Equilateral triangular areas filled w/paint have “bulls eyes” lots of paint covers design field leaving relatively small amounts of undecorated area HOHOKAM CLASSIC good to poor line execution, poor–fugitive paint possible (buffs especially) general rectilinear shape of motifs & elements complex “woven” symmetry of layout commonly truncated as band designs line work elaboration has elongated triangles pendant dots, triangles with flags, hatchure vertical hatchure separates panels of bands areas of checker boards and crosshature incorporated into whole design
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Hohokam brown ware Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware Hohokam Red-on-brown Wares. Rim sherd stylistic elements could not be identified to a type. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels. Rather distinct Hohokam design styles were used in multiple ceramic wares in the Hohokam area through time. The Hohokam stylistic tradition was divided into three temporally-based traditions - the Hohokam Colonial, Sedentary, and Classic periods. The characteristics of the Hohokam Colonial, Hohokam Sedentary, and Hohokam Classic stylistic traditions are as follows (A Laboratory Plan for Salado Research, pp. 3-34 -- 3-36): HOHOKAM COLONIAL fine line execution, good paint hatching used as background, zig–zag line hature a multitude of animal, bird, and human motifs and elements (dancing figures, burden carriers, flute players, birds (in positive & negative) reptiles, and quadrapeds) trailing lines on bowl exteriors (exterior grooving of paste) HOHOKAM SEDENTARY some what sloppy, freely–executed curvilinear motifs scrolls, linework with equlateral triangles, bumps and hatchure common small elements occur (Hohokam “alphabet” as well as circles, dots, birds, animals) Equilateral triangular areas filled w/paint have “bulls eyes” lots of paint covers design field leaving relatively small amounts of undecorated area HOHOKAM CLASSIC good to poor line execution, poor–fugitive paint possible (buffs especially) general rectilinear shape of motifs & elements complex “woven” symmetry of layout commonly truncated as band designs line work elaboration has elongated triangles pendant dots, triangles with flags, hatchure vertical hatchure separates panels of bands areas of checker boards and crosshature incorporated into whole design
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Tanque Verde R/brown Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Hohokam Red-on-brown, Tanque Verde Red-on-brown. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels. Rather distinct Hohokam design styles were used in multiple ceramic wares in the Hohokam area through time. The Hohokam stylistic tradition was divided into three temporally-based traditions - the Hohokam Colonial, Sedentary, and Classic periods. The characteristics of the Hohokam Colonial, Hohokam Sedentary, and Hohokam Classic stylistic traditions are as follows (A Laboratory Plan for Salado Research, pp. 3-34 -- 3-36): HOHOKAM COLONIAL fine line execution, good paint hatching used as background, zig–zag line hature a multitude of animal, bird, and human motifs and elements (dancing figures, burden carriers, flute players, birds (in positive & negative) reptiles, and quadrapeds) trailing lines on bowl exteriors (exterior grooving of paste) HOHOKAM SEDENTARY some what sloppy, freely–executed curvilinear motifs scrolls, linework with equlateral triangles, bumps and hatchure common small elements occur (Hohokam “alphabet” as well as circles, dots, birds, animals) Equilateral triangular areas filled w/paint have “bulls eyes” lots of paint covers design field leaving relatively small amounts of undecorated area HOHOKAM CLASSIC good to poor line execution, poor–fugitive paint possible (buffs especially) general rectilinear shape of motifs & elements complex “woven” symmetry of layout commonly truncated as band designs line work elaboration has elongated triangles pendant dots, triangles with flags, hatchure vertical hatchure separates panels of bands areas of checker boards and crosshature incorporated into whole design
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
San Carlos R/brown Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Hohokam Red-on-brown, San Carlos Red-on-brown. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels. Rather distinct Hohokam design styles were used in multiple ceramic wares in the Hohokam area through time. The Hohokam stylistic tradition was divided into three temporally-based traditions - the Hohokam Colonial, Sedentary, and Classic periods. The characteristics of the Hohokam Colonial, Hohokam Sedentary, and Hohokam Classic stylistic traditions are as follows (A Laboratory Plan for Salado Research, pp. 3-34 -- 3-36): HOHOKAM COLONIAL fine line execution, good paint hatching used as background, zig–zag line hature a multitude of animal, bird, and human motifs and elements (dancing figures, burden carriers, flute players, birds (in positive & negative) reptiles, and quadrapeds) trailing lines on bowl exteriors (exterior grooving of paste) HOHOKAM SEDENTARY some what sloppy, freely–executed curvilinear motifs scrolls, linework with equlateral triangles, bumps and hatchure common small elements occur (Hohokam “alphabet” as well as circles, dots, birds, animals) Equilateral triangular areas filled w/paint have “bulls eyes” lots of paint covers design field leaving relatively small amounts of undecorated area HOHOKAM CLASSIC good to poor line execution, poor–fugitive paint possible (buffs especially) general rectilinear shape of motifs & elements complex “woven” symmetry of layout commonly truncated as band designs line work elaboration has elongated triangles pendant dots, triangles with flags, hatchure vertical hatchure separates panels of bands areas of checker boards and crosshature incorporated into whole design
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Little Colorado White Ware Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware Little Colorado White Ware. Rim sherd stylistic elements could not be identified to a type. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Holbrook A B/W Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Little Colorado White Ware, Holbrook A Black-on-white. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Holbrook B B/W Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Little Colorado White Ware, Holbrook B Black-on-white. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Padre B/W Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Little Colorado White Ware, Padre Black-on-white. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Walnut B/W Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Little Colorado White Ware, Walnut Black-on-white. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Tusayan Poly. Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the ceramic ware and type Miscellaneous Polychromes, Tusayan Polychromes. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
TOTAL The total number of individually identified vessels (across all decorated ceramic wares and types) in a given stratum.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Leupp B/W Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Little Colorado White Ware, Leupp Black-on-white. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
McDonald Corr. Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Corrugated Ware, McDonald Corrugated and McDonald Painted Corrugated. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Maverick Mountain Poly. Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Miscellaneous Polychromes, Maverick Mountain Polychrome. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Stratum Identifies a major natural or cultural depositional event such as erosional fill, roof fall, floor contexts, and sterile substrate (i.e., a single archaeological context in both horizontal and vertical space). Strata are depicted as horizontal rows of interconnected boxes on a Harris Matrix. This table contains data from multiple sites with multiple features and associated strata. Thus, in this table, a stratum is identified by combining several numbering systems: an ASM site number, a colon, a feature number, and a stratum letter designation. EX: U:3:198:006A, U:3:198:006B A stratum is a combination of an individual feature and a context in or associated with that feature. For example, Feature 10 might be a structure with an erosonial fill stratum, a roof fall stratum, a floor stratum, and a sterile substrate stratum. Within each feature, each stratum is designated by the feature number (e.g., 10, 11, 12, etc.) and a letter that designates a particular stratum (e.g., A, B, C). The levels excavated in a feature were aggregated into individual feature strata (e.g., Levels 1 - 3 = Stratum A). A feature's stratum letters are assigned in descending order. A context letter of "?" designates a mixed level or context or artifacts collected out of context. Examples: 0? = General Cultural Fill/No Feature and Indeterminate context 10A = Feature 10 and Context A 10B = Feature 10 and Context B 10C = Feature 10 and Context C 22? = Feature 22 and Mixed and/or Undefined context 22A - Feature 22 and Context A Each stratum (e.g., 10C) is assigned to a stratum type. The stratum data are presented in separate strata data tables. Please see the Schoolhouse Point Mesa Strata data tables at the following tDAR urls: https://core.tdar.org/dataset/394455 https://core.tdar.org/dataset/394457 https://core.tdar.org/dataset/394458 https://core.tdar.org/dataset/394376 Examples: 10A = Feature 10 and Context A = Feature 10, erosional fill 10B = Feature 10 and Context B = Feature 10, roof fall 10C = Feature 10 and Context C = Feature 10, floor Artifacts collected from each feature are tallied according to strata. For example, artifacts collected from Feature 10 are tallied for Stratum A, Stratum B, Stratum C, etc.
VARCHAR  Uncoded Value Provenience and Context : Stratum none none
Santa Cruz R/buff Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Hohokam Red-on-buff, Santa Cruz Red-on-buff. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels. Rather distinct Hohokam design styles were used in multiple ceramic wares in the Hohokam area through time. The Hohokam stylistic tradition was divided into three temporally-based traditions - the Hohokam Colonial, Sedentary, and Classic periods. The characteristics of the Hohokam Colonial, Hohokam Sedentary, and Hohokam Classic stylistic traditions are as follows (A Laboratory Plan for Salado Research, pp. 3-34 -- 3-36): HOHOKAM COLONIAL fine line execution, good paint hatching used as background, zig–zag line hature a multitude of animal, bird, and human motifs and elements (dancing figures, burden carriers, flute players, birds (in positive & negative) reptiles, and quadrapeds) trailing lines on bowl exteriors (exterior grooving of paste) HOHOKAM SEDENTARY some what sloppy, freely–executed curvilinear motifs scrolls, linework with equlateral triangles, bumps and hatchure common small elements occur (Hohokam “alphabet” as well as circles, dots, birds, animals) Equilateral triangular areas filled w/paint have “bulls eyes” lots of paint covers design field leaving relatively small amounts of undecorated area HOHOKAM CLASSIC good to poor line execution, poor–fugitive paint possible (buffs especially) general rectilinear shape of motifs & elements complex “woven” symmetry of layout commonly truncated as band designs line work elaboration has elongated triangles pendant dots, triangles with flags, hatchure vertical hatchure separates panels of bands areas of checker boards and crosshature incorporated into whole design
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Salado W/R Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type Salado Wares (Roosevelt Red Wares), Salado White-on-red. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Showlow B/R Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the ceramic ware and type Miscellaneous Wares, Showlow Black-on-red. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Tucson Poly. Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the ceramic ware and type Miscellaneous Polychromes, Tucson Polychromes. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
Site The archaeological sites from which the decorated ceramics were recovered. In this table, sites are identified by an Arizona State Museum (ASM) site number. Arizona State Museum numbers begin with the designation "AZ." They then use a three-part numbering system. A letter, beginning with "A" and continuing to "FF", designates one of many arbitrary rectangles that divide the state into rectangular units, each of which includes 16 U.S.G.S topographic maps in a 15-minute series. The letter is followed by a number that refers to a 15-minute series map in a given rectangular unit. The numbers begin with 1 in the northwest corner and continue to 16 in the southeast corner. The map number is followed by a site number, which are allocated sequentially within a 15-minute series map. Each of these elements are separated by colons. At the end of the number, it is customary to provide a short-hand for the state institution that assigned the number (e.g., ASM, ASU, NAU), as several institutions have assigned site numbers throughout Arizona. EX: AZ U:8:23(ASM) Site AZ U:8:23(ASM) also has a a Tonto National Forest site number: AR-03-12-06-177. Please see the Roosevelt Platform Mound Study Site Concordance Table to match the ASM number(s) to the Tonto National Forest number(s).
VARCHAR  Uncoded Value Provenience and Context : Site none none
St. John's B/R Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type White Mountain Red Ware, St. Johns Black-on-red. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none
St. John's Poly. Frequency of individual vessels that were identified to the decorated ceramic ware and type White Mountain Red Ware, St. Johns Polychrome. The Stage 2 Ceramic Decorated/Intrusive analysis examined rim sherds assigned to the same (i.e., individually recognized) vessels to determine ceramic ware and type. Thus, this table records rim sherds assigned to single vessels.
BIGINT  Uncoded Value Ceramic : Count none none

Keywords


Temporal Coverage

Calendar Date: 900 to 1450


Spatial Coverage

min long: -111.012; min lat: 33.635 ; max long: -110.991; max lat: 33.662 ;

Individual & Institutional Roles

Contact(s): USDI Bureau of Reclamation, Phoenix Area Office

Contributor(s): Peter H. McCartney ; Ronna J. Bradley ; Judi L. Cameron ; J. Phil Dering ; Suzanne K. Fish ; Chris Loendorf ; Theodore J. Oliver ; Marcia H. Regan ; Christy G. Turner II ; Sheldon T. Watson ; Linda K. Williams

Lab Director(s): Arleyn W. Simon

Principal Investigator(s): Glen E. Rice ; Charles Redman

Sponsor(s): USDI Bureau of Reclamation, Phoenix Area Office

Repository(s): Center for Archaeology and Society, Arizona State University

Prepared By(s): Office of Cultural Resource Management, Arizona State University

Submitted To(s): USDI Bureau of Reclamation, Phoenix Area Office


Record Identifiers

Roosevelt Monograph Series(s): 8

Anthropological Field Studies(s): 37

Bureau of Reclamation Contract No.(s): 9-CS-32-06230

Notes

General Note: The Archaeological Research Institute, Arizona State University stored and maintained the digital file(s) hosted on this record page as part of the Roosevelt Platform Mound Study (RPMS) digital collections. The data were stored in a single Excel file with multiple tabs. Each tab contained a data sheet that summarized the frequencies of a particular artifact class and/or type that was analyzed during the RPMS laboratory studies. The data sheets were standardized across the different project areas. To curate these data in tDAR, each tab was converted into a single Excel file. Each file contains the frequency data for a particular artifact class and/or type.

General Note: The Office of Cultural Resource Management and the Archaeological Research Institute, Arizona State University intended for the data sheets and the artifact categories in the sheets to remain consistent (i.e., standardized) across the sheets and across the different project areas. During the course of this curation project, several inconsistencies were identified in the artifact categories (i.e., column names). Where appropriate, minor wording, spelling, and/or word order changes were made to column headings to ensure standardization across artifact class and/or type names. For example, some data tables used the column names "Full-Trough Metate," "3/4-Trough Metate," "Slab Metate," etc., while others used the names "Metate, Full-Trough," "Metate, 3/4-Trough," "Metate, Slab." Center for Archaeology and Society and tDAR staff decided to ensure standardization to the "Metate, ..." column names.


File Information

  Name Size Creation Date Date Uploaded Access
shmesa_all_decorated.xlsx 79.33kb Jan 22, 2015 6:26:50 PM Public
Translated version shmesa_all_decorated_translated.xls (247.50kb)
Data column(s) in this dataset have been associated with coding sheet(s) and translated:
Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America