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Petrographic and geochemical evidence reveals the local focus of interaction throughout Samoa’s prehistory

Author(s): Timothy Rieth ; Ethan Cochrane

Year: 2015

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Summary

Bill Dickinson’s extensive and unequaled ceramic petrographic research has identified spatial patterns of artefact production and population interaction across the Pacific Islands. In Samoa his work on ceramic collections suggests a largely local focus of production and distribution. We combine Dickinson’s ceramic petrography with all available geochemical analyses of ceramics, basalt and obsidian artefacts, and demonstrate local-scale production and movement for all of these artefact classes. Additionally, local artefact production and distribution is the dominant pattern for Samoa’s prehistory. We argue these patterns are explained by Samoa’s demographic history and environment.

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Petrographic and geochemical evidence reveals the local focus of interaction throughout Samoa’s prehistory. Ethan Cochrane, Timothy Rieth. Presented at The 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, California. 2015 ( tDAR id: 395134)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
Oceania


Spatial Coverage

min long: 111.973; min lat: -52.052 ; max long: -87.715; max lat: 53.331 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America