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The Multi-Kiva Site: A new perspective on the Pueblo III period occupation of the middle Little Colorado River valley

Author(s): Richard Lange ; Krystal Britt

Year: 2015

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Summary

Previous research in the middle Little Colorado River valley of Northern Arizona has characterized the Pueblo III period (1125-1275 C.E.) as dominated by dispersed pithouse villages which were later replaced by the aggregated cluster of masonry pueblos at Homol’ovi. Recent survey and excavation in this region shed new light on the occupation and land use of the middle Little Colorado River valley prior to Pueblo IV. The landscape is dotted with mid-sized pueblos that may have acted as centralized locations which facilitated the integration of dispersed settlements. This paper will present data from testing and excavation of one such pueblo, the Multi-Kiva Site (AZ P:3:112[ASM]), in 2012 to 2014. Additionally, this paper seeks to draw comparisons between Multi-Kiva and other contemporaneous and analogous pueblos in the region through architectural and ceramic analysis to refine our understanding of the Pueblo III period in the middle Little Colorado River valley and beyond.

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The Multi-Kiva Site: A new perspective on the Pueblo III period occupation of the middle Little Colorado River valley. Krystal Britt, Richard Lange. Presented at The 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, California. 2015 ( tDAR id: 395421)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -115.532; min lat: 30.676 ; max long: -102.349; max lat: 42.033 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America