tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

Community Formation and Integration in Colonial Alta California

Author(s): Kathleen Hull ; John Douglass

Year: 2015

» Downloads & Basic Metadata


Community formation and integration in colonial settings has traditionally been viewed from the binary perspective of colonists and native people. This session views the concept of community in colonial Alta California (1769-1834) from more holistic and alternative viewpoints. To set the stage for this discussion, this introductory paper offers an overview of the sociopolitical landscape in colonial Alta California and presents a broad discussion of the concept of "community" as it may pertain to the region. How were communities formulated and integrated in colonial settings such as Alta California? Communities are not natural creations, as there are inherent tensions and conflicts within groups, whether by age, gender, ethnicity, or other constructs. What were the geographic and social scales of community seen in colonial settings? Were there "imagined" communities and, if so, in what settings and situations did they emerge? In what ways did multiethnic communities emerge within traditional colonial settings such as pueblos? Drawing primarily on ethnohistoric resources, a case study of the Pueblo of Los Angeles , serves to demonstrate the multi-faceted concept of community and the nature of multiethnic interactions and community formation colonial Alta California.

SAA 2015 abstracts made available in tDAR courtesy of the Society for American Archaeology and Center for Digital Antiquity Collaborative Program to improve digital data in archaeology. If you are the author of this presentation you may upload your paper, poster, presentation, or associated data (up to 3 files/30MB) for free. Please visit for instructions and more information.

This Resource is Part of the Following Collections

Cite this Record

Community Formation and Integration in Colonial Alta California. John Douglass, Kathleen Hull. Presented at The 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, California. 2015 ( tDAR id: 395507)


Spatial Coverage

min long: -125.464; min lat: 32.101 ; max long: -114.214; max lat: 42.033 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America