tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

Human response to sea-level change in the Early Holocene: examples from the continental shelf

Author(s): Jonathan Benjamin

Year: 2015

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

Human response to sea-level rise is an important aspect within the broader topic of coastal prehistory. Sites found on today's continental shelf directly contribute to the archaeological record and are, in some cases well preserved under water. Recent emphasis on continental shelf archaeology, or submerged prehistory, has encouraged prehistorians to embrace underwater archaeology in order to fully appreciate past lifeways and adaptation to sea-level change in the final Pleistocene and early Holocene. Examples from northern Europe and the Mediterranean basin will be discussed.

SAA 2015 abstracts made available in tDAR courtesy of the Society for American Archaeology and Center for Digital Antiquity Collaborative Program to improve digital data in archaeology. If you are the author of this presentation you may upload your paper, poster, presentation, or associated data (up to 3 files/30MB) for free. Please visit http://www.tdar.org/SAA2015 for instructions and more information.


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections


Cite this Record

Human response to sea-level change in the Early Holocene: examples from the continental shelf. Jonathan Benjamin. Presented at The 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, California. 2015 ( tDAR id: 395688)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -11.074; min lat: 37.44 ; max long: 50.098; max lat: 70.845 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America