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THE ART OF PRESERVING SKINS IN THE GREAT TEMPLE OF TENOCHTITLAN

Author(s): Norma Valentin

Year: 2015

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Summary

The use of animal fur in ancient Mesoamerica is well known due to the historical records, sculpture and painting. Archaeologically, it has been inferred by some evidence, as the presence and absence of certain animal bones and the cultural traces they present (abrasions, cuts and perforations, for example). In the offerings of the Sacred Precinct of Tenochtitlan, Mexico, there has been found a large number of skeletal remains of four classes of vertebrates (fishes, reptiles, birds and mammals) which traces allow us to tell that these are vestiges of preserving hides. Detailed analyses of the bird bones has allowed to find a group with strong similarities in their manufacturing traces, that can be proposed to pertain to a tenocha style, in contrast to others that are thought to be of foreign origin.

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THE ART OF PRESERVING SKINS IN THE GREAT TEMPLE OF TENOCHTITLAN. Norma Valentin. Presented at The 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, California. 2015 ( tDAR id: 395845)


Keywords

General
Aztecs Birds Taxidermy

Geographic Keywords
Mesoamerica


Spatial Coverage

min long: -107.271; min lat: 12.383 ; max long: -86.353; max lat: 23.08 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America