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Center and Satellites The Relationship of Templo Mayor to Similar 
twin-temple pyramids in Central Mexico

Author(s): Aaron Ott

Year: 2015

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Summary

This poster displays the relationship between the Great Temple of Tenochtitlán and four smaller pyramids, of similar architecture, concurrently in operation during the period of Aztec dominance in central Mexico. I will demonstrate how the satellite pyramids worked in conjunction with Templo Mayor to form a cohesive religious network, reflecting shared ideology through common ritual use . Using the ethnographic analogy of medieval Catholicism, I will show how Mexica-Aztec religion utilized this network of ritual centers to strengthen sociopolitical controls at the center of their empire. My poster will include recent photographs taken of the five sites in question (Templo Mayor, Tlatelolco, Tenayuca, Teopanzolco and Santa Cecilia Acatitlan), with comparative analysis regarding their distinct features. This reflects Aztec power cohesion, in central Mexico, during the Late Post Classic period.

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Cite this Record

Center and Satellites The Relationship of Templo Mayor to Similar 
twin-temple pyramids in Central Mexico. Aaron Ott. Presented at The 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, California. 2015 ( tDAR id: 397511)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
Mesoamerica


Spatial Coverage

min long: -107.271; min lat: 12.383 ; max long: -86.353; max lat: 23.08 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America