tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

Deconstructing Multiple Intersecting Identities and Cremation Ritual among the Preclassic Hohokam of the Tucson Basin

Author(s): Jessica Cerezo-Román

Year: 2015

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

Hohokam cremation funerary customs are unraveled to acquire a deeper understanding of intersecting identity differences among seven Preclassic Period archaeological sites (A.D. 475-1150) of the Tucson Basin. This is done by analyzing the mortuary treatment of 477 individual remains using two primary datasets: (1) biological profile of the skeletal remains; and, (2) posthumous treatment of the body inferred from the analysis of the remains and archaeological contexts. Results indicate the existence of social differences in funerary practices related to age at death and sex identity intersections. However, there also were differences between sites in how individuals were treated related to different community social networks of interaction. The results provide a glimpse of the potential social variation and multiple social groups within Tucson Basin Preclassic Period Hohokam sites.

SAA 2015 abstracts made available in tDAR courtesy of the Society for American Archaeology and Center for Digital Antiquity Collaborative Program to improve digital data in archaeology. If you are the author of this presentation you may upload your paper, poster, presentation, or associated data (up to 3 files/30MB) for free. Please visit http://www.tdar.org/SAA2015 for instructions and more information.


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections


Cite this Record

Deconstructing Multiple Intersecting Identities and Cremation Ritual among the Preclassic Hohokam of the Tucson Basin. Jessica Cerezo-Román. Presented at The 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, California. 2015 ( tDAR id: 398004)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
North America - Southwest


Spatial Coverage

min long: -115.532; min lat: 30.676 ; max long: -102.349; max lat: 42.033 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America