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Borneo rainforest as a social artefact: insights from integrated methodologies in archaeology, ethnography, and environmental science

Author(s): Graeme Barker

Year: 2016

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Summary

Borneo has a 50,000-year record of Homo sapiens’ interactions with rainforest, a history assembled by the inter-disciplinary studies of human occupation evidence in the Niah Caves on the coastal plain of Sarawak. That project involved a collaboration in particular between archaeologists and environmental scientists, with studies for example in geomorphology, palynology, zooarchaeology, archaeobotany, palaeobiology, and material culture studies. More recent work by many of the same team in the interior of Borneo, in the Kelabit Highlands of Sarawak, has combined those approaches with ethnography and anthropology to investigate recent and present-day as well as past human-rainforest interactions. What is emerging is the rainforest as a social artefact, with very different ecological histories related to people’s different ways of living together as well as how they extracted their livelihoods from the forest.


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Borneo rainforest as a social artefact: insights from integrated methodologies in archaeology, ethnography, and environmental science. Graeme Barker. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Orlando, Florida. 2016 ( tDAR id: 402879)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: 59.678; min lat: 4.916 ; max long: 92.197; max lat: 37.3 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America