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Human Ecology (Other Keyword)

1-17 (17 Records)

The Assumption of Insular Marginality: The Curious Case of Isla Cedros, Baja California (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 395131] Matthew Des Lauriers. Danny Sosa.

What about islands inspires us to think of them as places on ‘the edge?’ The idea of an island is often more remote than the reality. The word itself conjures up notions of loneliness and isolation. Some islands are inextricably linked, to other islands and/or the adjacent mainland, while the nonpareil isolation of Rapa Nui is legendary. Lying off the Pacific Coast of Baja California, Isla Cedros presents a strange combination of these factors. The island supported a large resident...


Bass Pond Dam Site: Intensive Archeological Testing at a Formative Period Base Camp On Kiawah Island, South Carolina (1979)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 181190] James L. Michie.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Borneo rainforest as a social artefact: insights from integrated methodologies in archaeology, ethnography, and environmental science (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 402879] Graeme Barker.

Borneo has a 50,000-year record of Homo sapiens’ interactions with rainforest, a history assembled by the inter-disciplinary studies of human occupation evidence in the Niah Caves on the coastal plain of Sarawak. That project involved a collaboration in particular between archaeologists and environmental scientists, with studies for example in geomorphology, palynology, zooarchaeology, archaeobotany, palaeobiology, and material culture studies. More recent work by many of the same team in the...


Dakota or Sioux Indians, a Study In Human Ecology (1966)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 52585] James H. Howard.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Escaping Collapse in Northwest Mexico: Social and Environmental Factors of Resiliency at La Ferrería, Durango, Mexico (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 403915] Andrew Somerville. Jose Luis Punzo Díaz.

The end of the Mesoamerican Classic Period (ca. AD 900) was a time characterized by widespread social change, political upheaval, and broad regional drought conditions. In Northwest Mexico, several large centers such as La Quemada and Alta Vista were abandoned and never reoccupied. The site of La Ferrería in the Guadiana Valley of Durango, however, remained an important site for several centuries into the Postclassic Period. This presentation explores the social and environmental factors that...


Feedback Loops, Demographic Circumscription, and Changing Labor Organization on Isla Cedros, Baja California, Mexico (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 405131] Matthew Des Lauriers. Dustin Merrick.

Discussions of resilience theory (see Redman 2005; Folke 2006; and others) and its application to ancient human ecological systems view the process of cultural change as perpetually dynamic and involving patterns reliant upon a wide range of underlying factors constantly altered by a variety of catalysts and forces. This differs from more linear arguments of transformation by unidirectional external forcing. One such complex transformation occurred on Isla Cedros Baja California, in the Late...


Human Ecodynamics of Subarctic Islands of the North Atlantic and North Pacific in Comparative Perspective (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 403143] Ben Fitzhugh. George Hambrecht. Michael Etnier. Catherine West.

The subarctic islands of the North Atlantic and North Pacific share a number of ecological characteristics, related to common latitudes and similar oceanographic and atmospheric conditions. Both regions were occupied in pre-modern times by subsistence harvesters with varying degrees of dependence on the marine environments for survival, and both areas became incorporated into capitalist, commercial fishing and hunting markets in the past several centuries. We compare the historical ecology of...


Man and the Environment: An Introduction to Human Ecology and Evolution (1971)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 255899] Arthur S. Boughey.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Mitigative Archaeological Excavations at Two Sites for the Cottonwood Pass Project, Chaffee and Gunnison Counties, Colorado (1986)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 140744] Kevin D. Black.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Prehistory and Human Ecology of the Western Prairies and Northern Plains: Papers In Honor of Robert A. Alex. Plains Anthropologist, Memoir No. 27 (1993)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 87939] J. A. Tiffany.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Preliminary Report On Two Ocean Lake 1 (48Te357): a Seasonal Camp in Grand Teton National Park (1976)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 40975] Gary A. Wright. Stuart A. Reeve.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Recent Analyses of the Faunal Assemblage from the Submerged Cave Site of Hoyo Negro: Implications for Late Pleistocene Human Ecology Research on the Yucatan Peninsula (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434777] Dominique Rissolo. James C. Chatters. Joaquin Arroyo-Cabrales. Alberto E Nava Blank. Blaine Schubert. H. Gregory McDonald. Pilar Luna Erreguerena.

In addition to a nearly complete human skeleton dating to the Late Pleistocene, the submerged cave site of Hoyo Negro contains a diverse and well preserved assemblage of extinct and extant fauna from the Yucatan Peninsula. Recent and on-going investigations have focused on the documentation, sampling, and partial recovery of select specimens for description and analysis. Of particular interest are bears of the genus Tremarctos, a yet unnamed megalonychid ground sloth, cougars (Puma concolor),...


Small, But Not Insignificant: Human Subsistence, Ecology, and Land Use on Anacapa Island, California (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 395064] Torben Rick. Leslie Reeder-Myers. Kenneth Gobalet. Nicholas Jew. Thomas Wake.

Anacapa Island (2.9 km2) is the second smallest of California’s Channel Islands and has limited freshwater and terrestrial biodiversity. Called ‘Anayapax, a word meaning deception or mirage, by the Chumash, archaeologists have long speculated that the island was occupied seasonally or as a stopover by people based on the mainland or other islands. Here, we focus on our recent archaeological research at CA-ANI-2 and other Anacapa sites. Occupied between about 3130 and 2750 cal BP, CA-ANI-2...


Tool-kits, Subsistence, and Land-use Patterns: The Neanderthal Ecology Revisited across a Dense Cultural Sequence in the Alpine chain (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 429487] Marco Peresani. Davide Delpiano. Kristen Heasley. Nicola Nannini. Matteo Romandini.

Studies of the way Neanderthal groups used knapping technologies and organized their economy and land-use are sparse in Europe and even scantier in the Alps, so only in some regions can cyclical and seasonal residential movements be inferred from data on the exploitation of ungulates with variable levels of migratory behavior. Two of the most widespread methods used in stone knapping were the Discoidal and Levallois. However, analyses of these lithic artifacts are not yet sufficiently integrated...


Volcanic Activity and Human Ecology (1979)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 150343] Payson D. Sheets. Donald K. Grayson.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Where are the camelids? II: contributions from the stable isotope ecology to understand mobility and exchange patterns in the South Central Andes (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 430364] Eugenia Gayo. Daniela Valenzuela. Isabel Cartagena. Calogero M. Santoro. Claudio Latorre.

There is a growing volume of literature arguing that camelids were a local resource for Prehispanic societies that inhabited the coastal and intermediate Andean valleys from Peru. Indeed, existing evidences show uninterrupted herding practices along the Peruvian lowlands (>2,000 masl) at 8°S-16.5°S during the interval 800 BC-1100 AD. Although camelids archeofaunal remains, textiles and iconographic representations are recurrent in low-elevation sites from the northernmost Chile (17°-19°S), the...


The Zooarchaeology and Isotopic Ecology of the Bahamian Hutia (Geocapromys ingrahami) (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 429946] Michelle LeFebvre. Susan deFrance. George Kamenov. William Keegan. John Krigbaum.

Bahamian hutia (Geocapromys ingrahami) are small sized rodents endemic to the Bahamas. Fossil and subfossil records indicate broad geographic distribution of the rodent across the Bahamas in the past, while today Bahamian hutia naturally occur on one island. Bahamian hutia have received little attention archaeologically resulting in critical gaps in our understanding of both natural and anthropogenic patterns in Bahamian hutia distribution and life history. In conjunction with "traditional"...

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America