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Where are the camelids? II: contributions from the stable isotope ecology to understand mobility and exchange patterns in the South Central Andes

Author(s): Eugenia Gayo ; Daniela Valenzuela ; Isabel Cartagena ; Calogero M. Santoro ; Claudio Latorre

Year: 2017

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Summary

There is a growing volume of literature arguing that camelids were a local resource for Prehispanic societies that inhabited the coastal and intermediate Andean valleys from Peru. Indeed, existing evidences show uninterrupted herding practices along the Peruvian lowlands (>2,000 masl) at 8°S-16.5°S during the interval 800 BC-1100 AD. Although camelids archeofaunal remains, textiles and iconographic representations are recurrent in low-elevation sites from the northernmost Chile (17°-19°S), the relationship of these records with the widespread husbandry pattern detected across the neighboring region has not yet been explored. Moreover, the traditional view that camelids in low-elevation archaeological contexts were brought about by social-economic trade networks with the adjacent highlands (>3,500 masl) still persists. Here, I tackle these issues by reconstructing the origin for camelid in-bone charki found in a caravan site (1000 AD) from the Lluta Valley (18°S, 1100 masl). Specifically, by implementing zooarcheological analyses, stable isotopes characterization of bone-collagen and Bayesian statistical analyses we attempt to delineate a quantitative case study for evaluating life-history traits of low-elevation camelids that could provide insightful means for identifying converge/divergences in mobility patterns along the south central-Andes.


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Where are the camelids? II: contributions from the stable isotope ecology to understand mobility and exchange patterns in the South Central Andes. Eugenia Gayo, Daniela Valenzuela, Isabel Cartagena, Calogero M. Santoro, Claudio Latorre. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 430364)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
South America


Spatial Coverage

min long: -93.691; min lat: -56.945 ; max long: -31.113; max lat: 18.48 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 15599

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America