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ROMANCING THE STONES: ANALYSES OF THE CHIPPED STONE FROM THE TISZA CULTURE SITE OF HÓDMEZŐVÁSÁRHELY-GORZSA, HUNGARY

Author(s): Barbara Voytek

Year: 2016

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ROMANCING THE STONES: ANALYSES OF THE CHIPPED STONE FROM THE TISZA CULTURE SITE OF HÓDMEZŐVÁSÁRHELY-GORZSA, HUNGARY

The chipped stone tools from the Gorzsa tell in southeast Hungary have been studied over a period of 15 years with effectively five study seasons (1999, 2000, 2001, 2011 and 2012). A total of over 3,000 chipped stone artefacts were examined in terms of raw material, technology, and microscopic evidence of use, during a study which took place at the Mora Ference Museum in Szeged. This paper provides the study objectives, methodology, and findings. Using lithic data from the site, the author, together with Elisabetta Starnini (University of Torino, Italy), examined social and cultural developments that characterized the Late Neolithic. It was clear that the inhabitants of the site of Hódmezővásárhely-Gorzsa had a good knowledge of, and access to, the raw materials that they chose. By the time of the Tisza archaeological culture represented at the site, the landscape had been enculturated.The agro-pastoral subsistence base had been established. Connections with neighbouring territories, through exchange and/or trade, had been developed. Transformation continued, however, within the society particularly in terms of the development of social relations and the growth of socio-economic complexity.


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ROMANCING THE STONES: ANALYSES OF THE CHIPPED STONE FROM THE TISZA CULTURE SITE OF HÓDMEZŐVÁSÁRHELY-GORZSA, HUNGARY. Barbara Voytek. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Orlando, Florida. 2016 ( tDAR id: 404454)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -11.074; min lat: 37.44 ; max long: 50.098; max lat: 70.845 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America