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The Clovis-Cumberland-Dalton Succession: The Evolution of Behavioral Adaptations During the Pleistocene/Holocene Transition

Author(s): Jesse Tune

Year: 2016

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Summary

Considerable debate has recently been focused on understanding the effects of the Younger Dryas on human behavioral adaptations throughout the Northern Hemisphere. It has been proposed that adverse paleoecological conditions in southeastern North America triggered a decline and/or substantial reorganization in human populations. The Tennessee Paleoindian biface data in the Paleoindian Database of the Americas is used to assess the evolution of behavioral adaptations during the Pleistocene/Holocene Transition. These changes are considered in relation to regional paleoecological data. Patterns in technological organization, landscape use, and toolstone selection do not support the hypothesis that climate changes during Younger Dryas adversely affected human populations in the interior Southeast. An alternative hypothesis is proposed and contends that changes in behavioral adaptations were a result of settling-in processes associated with initial regional colonization and increased regionalization throughout the Pleistocene/Holocene Transition.


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The Clovis-Cumberland-Dalton Succession: The Evolution of Behavioral Adaptations During the Pleistocene/Holocene Transition. Jesse Tune. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Orlando, Florida. 2016 ( tDAR id: 405223)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -91.274; min lat: 24.847 ; max long: -72.642; max lat: 36.386 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America