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Culture, Ship Construction, and Ecological Change: The Sailing Vessels of Pensacola’s Fishing Industry

Author(s): Nicole R Bucchino

Year: 2013

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Summary

Dubbed the "Gloucester of the Gulf," Pensacola and Northwest Florida experienced a tremendous growth in the popularity and success of local commercial fishing in the years following the Civil War.  Entrepreneurial fishermen arriving in Pensacola from New England fueled a massive market for Gulf of Mexico fish, constructing what would become the last all sail-powered commercial fleet in the country.  The connection between  the region’s Reconstruction-era industry and the natural environment in which it existed resulted in a complicated, interdependent relationship.  Considering marine characteristics, historical documents, and archaeological work undertaken on the wreck sites of former commercial vessels, this relationship becomes clear.  This paper thus describes the ways in which Northwest Florida’s environment significantly shaped the unique qualities of its fishing vessels and the lives of those who fished from them.  Equally important, it also discusses the many ways in which commercial vessels and fishermen shaped their natural surroundings.


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Cite this Record

Culture, Ship Construction, and Ecological Change: The Sailing Vessels of Pensacola’s Fishing Industry. Nicole R Bucchino. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England, U.K. 2013 ( tDAR id: 428494)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
1860-1930


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 500

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America