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From Fife to the Chesapeake: Scottish Immigrants and the Development of Public Landscapes in Early Eighteenth Century Maryland.

Author(s): michael lucas

Year: 2013

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Summary

Ninian Beall was captured at the Battle of Dunbar in 1650 along with many of his countrymen and sent to Maryland as an indentured servant.  Beall’s arrival marks an important milestone in the settlement of the Chesapeake region.  Beall sponsored the transport of many Scottish immigrants who settled along the banks of the Potomac and Patuxent Rivers.  Some of these individuals became powerful local politicians, slave owners, and active participants in trade with Native Americans living in the region.  Beall and James Stoddert were particularly important to the development of Prince George’s County, Maryland during the early eighteenth century.  Archaeological and historical data from the seventeenth century village of Charles Town will be used to show how the actions of these two individuals furthered the development of public institutions while contributing to the tensions between Native Americans, African Americans, and Europeans living in the region.


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Cite this Record

From Fife to the Chesapeake: Scottish Immigrants and the Development of Public Landscapes in Early Eighteenth Century Maryland.. michael lucas. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England, U.K. 2013 ( tDAR id: 428528)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
1680-1720


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 310

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America