The Comparative Archaeology of Anglo-American Slavery Regimes: Reconsidering the Chesapeake from the Perspective of Bermuda

Author(s): Marley Brown III

Year: 2013

Summary

Recent comparative scholarship by historians of Anglo-American slavery has emphasized the dynamic relationship between statute law and social practice, particularly as this relationship bears on such issues as economic agency, resistance to enslavement, and collective identity.  This paper revisits selected quarter sites excavated in Tidewater Virginia  in view of the material life of enslaved Bermudians during the eighteenth century.  Recent discoveries at a c. 1720-1860 domestic site in the western parish of Southampton, Bermuda  represent the first meaningful sample of consumer goods owned by enslaved Bermudians. When placed into the context of the island's legal codes of the same period, these materials reveal a distinctive kind of particpation in the consumer revolution, a complex pattern that can provide a new way to interpret consumer practices of enslaved Virginians,  More generally, the Bermuda-Virginia comparsion affords crtical insight into the larger process of creolization potentially.at work within each colony.

Cite this Record

The Comparative Archaeology of Anglo-American Slavery Regimes: Reconsidering the Chesapeake from the Perspective of Bermuda. Marley Brown III. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England, U.K. 2013 ( tDAR id: 428655)

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Keywords

Temporal Keywords
Colonial

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 443