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Indigenous Way Stations of Colonial New Mexico: New Evidence from the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument

Author(s): Elisheva Charm ; Severin Fowles

Year: 2017

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Summary

As the horse spread across the American Southwest on the heels of Spanish colonial project, Native American ways of moving were abruptly transformed. This was particularly the case for the many indigenous peoples from the Plains and Rocky Mountains who used equestrianism to build new regional economies based on wide-ranging nomadism. Along with these new ways of moving came a new emphasis on particular sorts of archaeological sites—notably, on the "way station" as a point on the landscape that was owned by none but visited by many different ethnic groups in the course of long-distance travels. In this poster we consider the distinct archaeological signature of colonial era way stations through an analysis of a large archaeological complex surrounding a spring in the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument.


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Cite this Record

Indigenous Way Stations of Colonial New Mexico: New Evidence from the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument. Elisheva Charm, Severin Fowles. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 428866)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -115.532; min lat: 30.676 ; max long: -102.349; max lat: 42.033 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 15881

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America