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Comparison Study of Ceramic Traditions in Neolithic Southeast Mainland China and Taiwan and Their Possible Interaction Modes

Author(s): Yahui He

Year: 2017

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Summary

For a long time, scholars have noticed that there are similarities in Neolithic ceramics from Southeast mainland China and Western Taiwan from specific periods. The provenance study adopting XRF (X-ray fluorescence) and ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) of analyzing stone adzes by scholars in recent years demonstrates that people in Southeast mainland China and western Taiwan did interact during the Neolithic dating back to 7450 B.P. From these studies, it is known that people transported raw materials from western Taiwan across the strait to mainland China. These studies reinforce the evidence of interaction as early as around 6000 B.P. The primary purpose of this paper is to figure out different ceramic traditions and possible types of interaction taking place between Southeast mainland China and Western Taiwan from around 7000 B.P. to 2000 B.P. In this article, the digital microscope is adopted to analyze the paste for the micro-view in order to sort the images of paste to obtain different groups of pastes with hypothesized different compositions based on the geological background of Southeast mainland China and western Taiwan.


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Comparison Study of Ceramic Traditions in Neolithic Southeast Mainland China and Taiwan and Their Possible Interaction Modes. Yahui He. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 428980)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: 66.885; min lat: -8.928 ; max long: 147.568; max lat: 54.059 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 17307

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America