tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

Spatial and temporal variation of prehistoric cultural elaboration in the Yazoo Basin of Mississippi

Author(s): Tiffany Raymond ; Carl Lipo

Year: 2017

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

The Yazoo Basin of Mississippi is a rich and varied landscape that has been inhabited by humans for millennia. Sediment cores and tree-ring dates have documented that populations living in the basin had to contend with massive flooding events as well as substantial environmental change over the course of the Holocene. Populations contended with these changes by shifting settlement patterns, altering in subsistence strategies, engaging in intergroup competition, as well as varying investments in cultural elaboration. The freshwater mussel shell ring phenomenon that emerged during the Archaic and Woodland periods, for example, may reflect a combination of these factors. This paper explores the degree to which spatial and temporal patterns of refuse deposition can be explained as cultural responses to environmental instability during the Archaic through Mississippian periods.


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections


Cite this Record

Spatial and temporal variation of prehistoric cultural elaboration in the Yazoo Basin of Mississippi. Tiffany Raymond, Carl Lipo. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 429014)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -91.274; min lat: 24.847 ; max long: -72.642; max lat: 36.386 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 14959

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America