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Ancient Crops, Modern Possibilities: A Study on the Potential for Millet Agriculture in the United States

Author(s): Cedric Habiyaremye ; Jade d'Alpoim Guedes ; Kevin Murphy

Year: 2017

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Summary

Millets are among the world’s oldest crops. Unique characteristics such as their adaptation to high temperatures, drought conditions, marginal environments and low-input farming systems, make millets promising rotational in diverse agro-environments across the U.S. Millets could play a vital role in the diversification of cropping systems and provides a regionally available source of highly nutritious cereal grain.

Despite being a very early domesticated cereal crop, and a major food source in East Asia, South Asia, and Africa, millets now play a relatively minor role in most human diets and agricultural systems. In order to fully examine their potential role as alternative crops in the U.S., new and expanded research is needed in the fields of millet agronomy, breeding, nutrition, and food science. This paper presents the archaeological background of millet domestication and spread as well as lessons learned from field and greenhouse trials. Crop niche models evaluate how millets could be adaptive in the arid regions across the United States.


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Ancient Crops, Modern Possibilities: A Study on the Potential for Millet Agriculture in the United States. Cedric Habiyaremye, Jade d'Alpoim Guedes, Kevin Murphy. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 429152)


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Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 16085

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America