tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

Splitting and Lumping: Decision-making and Meaning in Intentional Artifact Fragmentation and Deposition

Author(s): Kathleen Hull

Year: 2017

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

Drawing on archaeological data from the greater Los Angeles Basin, this paper examines sequences of intentional ground-stone artifact fragmentation and singular or multiple-recombined fragment placement within various feature contexts. Recent studies of putative communal mourning features have indicated an initial suite of intentional artifact fragmentation and treatment practices including pigmentation or burning, but ongoing study of these and other types of features has revealed additional practices that suggest acts designed to produce fragments of particular types (e.g., specific portions of tools) and/or a desired number of pieces that could be distributed individually or recombined in particular configurations for placement within one or more features. The potential significance and meaning of such splitting and lumping with respect to certain feature types is explored.


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections


Cite this Record

Splitting and Lumping: Decision-making and Meaning in Intentional Artifact Fragmentation and Deposition. Kathleen Hull. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 429505)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -125.464; min lat: 32.101 ; max long: -114.214; max lat: 42.033 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 14309

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America