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Sociopolitical Networks and the Transformation of Southern Appalachian Societies, A.D. 700-1400

Author(s): Jacob Lulewicz

Year: 2017

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Summary

This paper investigates how processes of societal transformation, including the emergence of sociopolitical hierarchies and socioeconomic inequalities, are shaped by the scale and structure of social networks. Across Southern Appalachia, during more than seven centuries of population growth and sociopolitical change, two distinct regional political traditions emerged in what are today northern Georgia and eastern Tennessee. Employing data on social signaling practices as materialized in ceramic traditions and ritual paraphernalia, this study compares changes to network topologies across the two regions to contextualize differences in long-term sociopolitical development. Using formal network analytical methods, this paper tracks the historical development of network structures to evaluate the emergence, and underlying organization, of two distinct sociopolitical traditions.


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Sociopolitical Networks and the Transformation of Southern Appalachian Societies, A.D. 700-1400. Jacob Lulewicz. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 429653)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -91.274; min lat: 24.847 ; max long: -72.642; max lat: 36.386 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 14867

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America