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The Clovis Lithic Technology at El Fin del Mundo: Early Paleoindian Mobility and Land Use Patterns in North-Central Sonora, Mexico

Author(s): Ismael Sánchez-Morales

Year: 2017

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Summary

Clovis populations are thought to have been wide ranging, highly mobile foragers, as reflected in stone tool raw material procurement patterns and technological features of associated lithic assemblages. Intense utilization of high quality non-local cryptocrystalline raw materials, heavy stone tool refurbishing and repair strategies, and a lithic industry based on bifacial reduction are main features of the Clovis lithic technological organization suggestive of high mobility. In north-central Sonora, Mexico, non-cryptocrystalline stone raw materials dominate the Clovis point assemblage, and extensive sources of igneous rocks were intensively exploited by Clovis flintknappers, which has been interpreted as evidence of less mobile, place oriented groups. At El Fin del Mundo, a multicomponent Clovis site located in north-central Sonora, local sources of rhyolite were largely exploited, and more than half of the Clovis stone tools were made on locally available raw materials. However, the analysis of the overall lithic technological organization at the site indicates that the stone tool assemblage is consistent with the idea of Clovis groups as wide ranging and highly mobile. Furthermore, the Clovis component from El Fin del Mundo is comparable to those from the San Pedro River Valley, which have been interpreted as resulting from highly mobile strategies.


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The Clovis Lithic Technology at El Fin del Mundo: Early Paleoindian Mobility and Land Use Patterns in North-Central Sonora, Mexico. Ismael Sánchez-Morales. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 430262)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -115.532; min lat: 30.676 ; max long: -102.349; max lat: 42.033 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 17356

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America