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Social Transition at Tumilaca la Chimba: A Bioarchaeological Analysis of Terminal Middle Horizon and Late Intermediate Period Mortuary Contexts

Author(s): Shannon Lowman ; Nicola Sharratt ; Bethany Turner

Year: 2017

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Summary

The centuries following Tiwanaku state decline circa AD 1000 were characterized by political fragmentation and social flux. In the Moquegua Valley, Peru, the first 250 years following the state’s demise are referred to as the terminal Middle Horizon (AD 1000-1250), a period during which considerable cultural continuity with Tiwanaku is evident despite political collapse. The following Late Intermediate Period (LIP) (AD 1250-1450) is marked by major changes in material culture, domestic architecture, and ceremonial practices as the valley likely underwent a process of population replacement. Drawing on skeletal data from one site (Tumilaca la Chimba) with both terminal Middle Horizon and LIP occupations, this poster examines stress and health across this turbulent transition. An osteological analysis of 20 individuals from the terminal Middle Horizon cemeteries and 23 individuals from the LIP period cemetery reveals significant differences in age and sex distributions and in differences in dental and skeletal pathologies between the two periods. These results provide insights into nutritional stress and disease exposure between these two occupations and underscore the importance of a bioarchaeological perspective in understanding the impacts of major social and political transition in the Andes.


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Social Transition at Tumilaca la Chimba: A Bioarchaeological Analysis of Terminal Middle Horizon and Late Intermediate Period Mortuary Contexts. Shannon Lowman, Nicola Sharratt, Bethany Turner. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 430271)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -93.691; min lat: -56.945 ; max long: -31.113; max lat: 18.48 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 17376

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America