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Osage Cultural Continuity and Change in the Contact Era: evidence from the flaked stone assemblages at the Brown and Carrington sites

Author(s): Laura Bruns ; Elizabeth Sobel ; F. Scott Worman ; Jack Ray

Year: 2017

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Summary

Many traditional anthropological studies used acculturation theory to understand Colonial era Native American cultural dynamics. Acculturation theory assumes a process of gradual culture change through the adoption of European culture. More recently, anthropologists have incorporated additional concepts including agency, scales of analysis, and historical silencing to more productively investigate not only indigenous culture change but also continuity during the historic period. The project reported here uses these ideas in a study of contact era continuity and change as reflected in Osage flaked stone technology. This is accomplished through analysis of flaked stone artifacts from house features and surrounding areas at two historic Osage sites - Brown and Carrington. These sites are located in western Missouri and were excavated by the University of Missouri under Carl Chapman from the 1941 through 1982. We present the research problems, methods, study sites, artifact samples, and the results of this study.


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Osage Cultural Continuity and Change in the Contact Era: evidence from the flaked stone assemblages at the Brown and Carrington sites. Laura Bruns, Elizabeth Sobel, F. Scott Worman, Jack Ray. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 430402)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -104.634; min lat: 36.739 ; max long: -80.64; max lat: 49.153 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 15517

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America