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The re-evaluating diachronic trends of corrugated ware and rim eversion of jars in the Virgin Branch Ancestral Pueblo ceramics using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating

Author(s): Sachiko Sakai

Year: 2017

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Summary

Although the ceramic chronology in the Virgin Branch Ancestral Puebloan area requires more well-dated ceramic assemblage, there are some generally accepted diachronic trends based on surface treatment and form. Corrugated ware, for example, is believed to date around A.D. 1050. Rim eversion of jar is also often used as time indicator; sharply everted rim is considered to be associated to later time period, and little or no everted rim is associated to earlier time period. This information may be useful for assessing the general site chronology, especially at the first stage of the survey. However, many more well date ceramic assemblages without ambiguous assumption are necessary to confirm these diachronic trends.The use of radiocarbon dating, however, is not the ideal option in the Mt. Trumbull area, as many sites in this area were occupied by multiple generations and few radiocarbon dates have been generated. This is in addition to the ambiguity of applying radiocarbon dating of organic remains to determine the age of associated ceramics. Thus, in this study, I apply optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating, which dates ceramics directly, to corrugated ware and rim sherds from Mt. Trumbull to re-evaluate these proposed diachronic trends of the region’s ceramics.


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The re-evaluating diachronic trends of corrugated ware and rim eversion of jars in the Virgin Branch Ancestral Pueblo ceramics using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating. Sachiko Sakai. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 430436)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -115.532; min lat: 30.676 ; max long: -102.349; max lat: 42.033 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 16503

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America