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The Role of Social Memory in Everyday Bodily Practices of Pottery Production and Consumption during the Late Moche Period (500 – 800 AD) on the North Coast of Peru

Author(s): Sally Lynch

Year: 2017

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Summary

Often the term ‘social memory’ conjures up ideas of grand commemoration events such as statues, museums, large scale construction and other public displays to remember the collective past. We must not forget, however, the seemingly mundane daily practices that help to create, maintain, and change society while simultaneously forming social identities. This study looks at the Late Moche period (500 – 800 AD) on the North Coast of Peru. It was a time of immense social, religious, and political change caused in part by environmental upheavals and foreign Highland influence. I propose to examine the role that bodily practices, in particular, pottery production and food consumption, have to play in the maintenance of a social past as well as future, particularly during periods of social unrest that characterized the Late Moche Period. The ceremonial centre of Huaca Colorada in the Jequetepeque Valley provides ample evidence for both mundane daily practices, as well as more overtly commemorative and symbolic events of architectural reconstruction. This study will examine their intersection, as well as evidence of continuity and change in pottery production and food consumption that highlights the role of daily practices in the formation of social memory during the Late Moche period.


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The Role of Social Memory in Everyday Bodily Practices of Pottery Production and Consumption during the Late Moche Period (500 – 800 AD) on the North Coast of Peru. Sally Lynch. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 430524)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
South America


Spatial Coverage

min long: -93.691; min lat: -56.945 ; max long: -31.113; max lat: 18.48 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 15900

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America