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Tutankhamun’s Burial Assemblage: Normative or atypical mortuary practices of the Eighteenth Dynasty of ancient Egypt?

Author(s): Danielle Phelps

Year: 2017

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Summary

The burial assemblage found in the tomb of Tutankhamun, a pharaoh of the Eighteenth Dynasty (circa 1330 BCE) of ancient Egypt, is one of the most renowned collection of artifacts to survive from antiquity. But does it fit within the normative mortuary practices of the Eighteenth Dynasty? A closer and more comprehensive examination of the material culture found in the tomb of Tutankhamun indicates that several normative patterns were followed; however, many of the artifacts suggests atypical practices most likely from the despoliation of the burial assemblages of Tutankhamun’s predecessors.


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Tutankhamun’s Burial Assemblage: Normative or atypical mortuary practices of the Eighteenth Dynasty of ancient Egypt?. Danielle Phelps. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 430557)


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Abstract Id(s): 15616

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America