tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

Colonization of the Land of Stone Money: Resolving the Unclear Origins of Early Settlements of Yap, Western Caroline Islands

Author(s): Matthew Napolitano ; Scott Fitzpatrick ; Geoffrey Clark ; Jessica Stone

Year: 2017

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

The prehistoric colonization of remote islands in Micronesia represents some of the most significant series of diasporas in human history. While archaeological and genetic research is shedding new light on the origins and timing of what were clearly multiple and chronologically disparate entries into the western and eastern Micronesian archipelagoes, many of these colonizing ventures are poorly understood. This is particularly true of Yap in the Western Caroline Islands. Unlike the Palau and the Mariana island groups, where robust archaeological and linguistic datasets reveal a relatively clear picture of settlement between ca. 3500-2800 cal BP, limited investigation and conflicting lines of evidence archaeologically, linguistically, and paleoenvironmentally, have resulted in significant gaps in our understanding of human settlement in the western Pacific. Identifying sites in Yap pre-2000 BP, alluded to by paleoecological data, has great potential for altering existing models of colonization and long-distance inter-island interaction in Remote Oceania. This paper presents the results of the first systematic archaeological survey on Yap dedicated to identifying evidence for colonization.


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections


Cite this Record

Colonization of the Land of Stone Money: Resolving the Unclear Origins of Early Settlements of Yap, Western Caroline Islands. Matthew Napolitano, Scott Fitzpatrick, Geoffrey Clark, Jessica Stone. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 430646)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
Oceania


Spatial Coverage

min long: 111.973; min lat: -52.052 ; max long: -87.715; max lat: 53.331 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 14330

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America