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Ecological, Archaeological, and Social Perspectives of Northern Coast Salish Marine Resource Management Systems

Author(s): Megan Caldwell ; Dana Lepofsky ; Robert Losey

Year: 2017

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Summary

Coastal peoples around the world have complex systems of marine management that are situated within and influenced by a myriad of social and ecological actions and contexts. On the Northwest Coast of North America, as elsewhere, understanding the physical and non-tangible aspects of these systems requires using diverse kinds of knowledge and data. In this presentation, we bring together traditional ecological knowledge of Tla’amin First Nation elders with archaeological data to understand the marine resource management systems of the Northern Coast Salish of southern British Columbia. Our archaeological data include fish and shellfish remains from middens, and the spatial distribution and forms of associated intertidal stone and wood features. By analyzing the archaeological evidence though a series of nested spatial scales, and combining these analyses with Tla’amin knowledge of marine ecosystems, we show how ancient systems of management ensured equal access to and sustained use of a suite of marine resources throughout the late Holocene.


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Ecological, Archaeological, and Social Perspectives of Northern Coast Salish Marine Resource Management Systems. Megan Caldwell, Dana Lepofsky, Robert Losey. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 430933)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -169.717; min lat: 42.553 ; max long: -122.607; max lat: 71.301 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 14296

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America