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A Tale of Two Management Plans: Comparing Visitor Impacts to Rock Art Sites on National Park Service Land vs. San Bernardino County Land

Author(s): Jeremy Freeman ; Mary Oster ; Jason Theuer

Year: 2017

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Summary

On July, 6 2016 it was announced that management of the Coyote Hole rock art site located near the village of Joshua Tree, California would be transferred from the San Bernardino County Flood Control District to the Native American Land Conservancy. The site’s proximity to Joshua Tree National Park (JOTR) provides a unique opportunity to compare this highly-accessible site with unregulated visitation to similarly threatened sites that are managed by JOTR. The publication of sensitive information pertaining to JOTR rock art sites, particularly through social media, has increasingly threatened sites and raised concerns regarding the effects of increased visitation. JOTR staff conducted a study of three panels at Coyote Hole and three panels within the park that exhibit variable degrees of accessibility, visitation, and histories of graffiti remediation. A methodology was developed to monitor and compare the transformational processes affecting rock art sites providing a better understanding of how increased visitation may adversely affect sites on public land. The methods and data here presented will be used to develop management plans for Coyote Hole and JOTR to determine appropriate visitation management strategies for rock art sites.


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A Tale of Two Management Plans: Comparing Visitor Impacts to Rock Art Sites on National Park Service Land vs. San Bernardino County Land. Jeremy Freeman, Mary Oster, Jason Theuer. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 431253)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -125.464; min lat: 32.101 ; max long: -114.214; max lat: 42.033 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 14737

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America