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Sustainable research in archaeological science: Examples from high-and low resolution biogeochemical studies of archaeological shell

Author(s): Meghan Burchell

Year: 2017

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Summary

Advances in archaeological sciences demonstrated the (almost) unlimited potential to apply new methods and techniques to existing and under-utilized archaeological collections. Developing programs of research using innovative and multi-disciplinary approaches to the analysis of material cultural, hard tissues, sediments and organic remains are critical to move the discipline of archaeological sciences forward. More critical, is the balance between technical skills one learns to become an ‘archaeometrist’ while still being rooted in contemporary anthropological theory. This paper discusses the results shell biogeochemical data, specifically oxygen and carbon isotopes and micro-growth patterns from sites across Canada British Columbia, Ontario and Newfoundland, revealing patterns of trade, seasonality, and landscape use over the past 6000 years. By combining low- and high-resolution studies on hard-tissues, such as shell, bone and teeth from existing collections, archaeologists can build sustainable archaeometric research programs to develop new environmental proxies and interpret past cultural, historical and natural environments.


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Sustainable research in archaeological science: Examples from high-and low resolution biogeochemical studies of archaeological shell. Meghan Burchell. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 431391)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -142.471; min lat: 42.033 ; max long: -47.725; max lat: 74.402 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 14757

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America