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The rise and fall of the bi-headed serpent: How much of Late Lima cultural development could be explain by an ENSO?

Author(s): Giancarlo Marcone

Year: 2017

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Summary

In the present paper, I will combine evidence of two sites: The Pachacamac Sanctuary and the domestic site of Lote B, both in the Lurín valley in order to discuss the political changes happening in the central coast to the onset of the middle horizon. Asking how these political changes related with the climatic variation register for the area in both bottom sea and lake cores.

I point out that this process of political centralization was contemporaneous with mayor climatic anomalies that have been proposed correspond of an ENSO. In specific, I will explore how the rise of a new political organization (called Late Lima) and their posterior dismiss related with this recorded climatic phenomena. At what level the transit of the Lima population at the Lurín Valley from independent communities under the Lima milieu, to be part of a local based Late Lima state. This state that finally disappear not leaving trace of occupation by the second half of the Middle Horizon. How much of these rise and fall of Late Lima was consequence of natural phenomena.


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Cite this Record

The rise and fall of the bi-headed serpent: How much of Late Lima cultural development could be explain by an ENSO?. Giancarlo Marcone. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 431828)


Keywords

Geographic Keywords
South America


Spatial Coverage

min long: -93.691; min lat: -56.945 ; max long: -31.113; max lat: 18.48 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 17353

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America