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Mythology, Battlefields, Shipwrecks, and Forts: The U.S. Army and the settlement of the Oregon Territory

Author(s): Mark A. Tveskov

Year: 2015

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Summary

United States colonialism in the  Oregon Territory was a maelstrom of hostility, ambiguity, and conflicting agendas among Native Americans, Gold miners, pioneer families, citizen militias, Indian agents, and Army personnel.  The U.S. Army's role in this drama was particularly ambiguous; many of the pro-states rights pioneers in this pre-Civil War era of the 1850s resented the soldiers—to the point of armed conflict--for defending the treaty rights of Native American people, while the Army was simultaneously ensuring the success of the American colonial venture in a variety of overt and subtle ways.  This paper considers how the U.S. Army stood out in the topography of this colonial landscape with reference to the material remains and documentary evidence from Fort Lane, the Camp Castaway shipwreck, and the Hungry Hill battlefield, and considers how this role was re-mythologized in the crafting of the frontier narrative.


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Cite this Record

Mythology, Battlefields, Shipwrecks, and Forts: The U.S. Army and the settlement of the Oregon Territory. Mark A. Tveskov. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Seattle, Washington. 2015 ( tDAR id: 433858)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
1850s


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 132

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America